Downloaded newest Windows 10 AMD Driver, what exactly does Vulkan RT do?

Discussion in 'Windows 10' started by Enzo Matrix, Mar 10, 2016.

  1. Enzo Matrix

    Enzo Matrix Guest

    Like the title, I downloaded the newest Windows 10 AMD Driver, what exactly does Vulkan RT do?
     
  2. Gharlane00

    Gharlane00 MDL Addicted

    Aug 26, 2009
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    From Intel's site

    Vulkan is the new generation of completely open standard APIs offering high-efficiency access to graphics and compute on modern GPUs. The Vulkan APIs were defined through collaboration among a wide range of graphics experts, including Intel. This new design provides the direct access to GPU acceleration that application developers have long demanded, and allows them fine-grain control to maximize performance and provide uniform user experience across different GPUs and operating environments.

    This is an important milestone for the industry, and Intel is pleased to support this new technology by providing industry-certified drivers for multiple generations of Intel graphics platforms, all readily available to developers and end users. These platforms include 5th Generation Intel Core Processors and 6th Generation Intel Core Processors. Today’s announcement is just the beginning of Intel’s commitment and comprehensive support for Vulkan APIs.
     
  3. MS_User

    MS_User MDL Guru

    Nov 30, 2014
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    why not just say is a driver;)
     
  4. Enzo Matrix

    Enzo Matrix Guest

    What's it's use to the end user? I don't program or anything, so do I need it?
     
  5. Paulsen

    Paulsen MDL Novice

    Jan 21, 2011
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    Basically, Vulkan replaces OpenGL, and Vulkan is the open-source "competitor" to DirectX 12, so, some game in the future will probably use Vulkan instead of DirectX; in short, if you play games often; and mostly, only newer games, some of them will eventually require either DX12 or Vulkan.

    The important part is, since Windows 10 does not currently include native Vulkan support (because the Vulkan API was released not so long ago; it does include OpenGL support however), drivers have to currently supply their own libraries for any app that requires or may use Vulkan (Nvidia started including Vulkan support in the 364.xx drivers)
     
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  6. burfadel

    burfadel MDL EXE>MSP/CAB

    Aug 19, 2009
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    AMD a couple of years ago introduced Mantle. This encouraged Microsoft to finally look into a better API, and DirectX 12 is the result. It has been suggested Microsoft started work on DirectX 12 before Mantle, but remember AMD would have had to start work on Mantle considerably earlier than when it was released. DirectX 12 apparently does borrow from Mantle, meaning without Mantle even if DirectX 12 was released, it wouldn't be as good as it is today. Vulkan on the other hand, is a direct evolution of Mantle, and is essentially Mantle 2.0. The reason why Vulkan is a cross-brand API is because AMD are heavy pushers of open source technology. Open source technology helps progress the industry and uptake of new technologies. Nvidia on the other hand are very proprietory minded, and you end up with mess like Physx and Gameworks etc. It's not exactly a shining example of progress.

    I'm not sure who will win out of DirectX 12 and Vulkan. For games to have DirectX 12 it precludes all those on Windows prior to Windows 10, and also those with old video cards who believe they are still at the cutting edge. To include DirectX 11 support in the game as well requires very significant work, seeing as DirectX 12 is completely different to DirectX 11, unlike 11 to 10 and 9 etc, where 10 and 11 are extensions to 9. Vulkan on the other hand supports older versions of Windows, although encouraging people with new systems to use Windows 7 or 8.1 probably isn't the best idea. I believe Vulkan is pretty much limited to the same graphics cards as those that support DirectX 12 (that is, DirectX feature level 11_1) or higher. Supporting Vulkan and OpenGL is the same issue as supporting DirectX 12 and DirectX 11. DirectX 12 and Vulkan support in the same game should be a much more simpler process due to the relation to Mantle, but it is unlikely that there will be too many games like this.

    DirectX 12 will probably do a bit better than Vulkan, since games on Xbox One will also be using DirectX 12 (the consoles already use a bare to metal system, so DirectX 12 is more about a few added features for consoles rather than performance improvement), porting them to Windows DirectX 12 is much more likely than porting to Windows Vulkan. That said, because of the similarities between the two it is possible for PC versions of games also on Xbox One to be Vulkan.
     
  7. cruxq

    cruxq MDL Junior Member

    Mar 31, 2010
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    No, it does not replace openGL. It is a new API, that has much more power than openGL.
    OpenGL will still be around for a long time as well, it isn't going anywhere.
    You will never be able to run openGL programs on Vulkan.

    No, this is wrong as well.
    Windows 7/8/10 don't have hardware accelerated openGL support at all. They have a minimal openGL1.1, and that is software based, and is incredibly slow.
    AMD & Nvidia & the rest offer hardware accelerated openGL once you install their drivers.
    The same with Vulkan, those get installed once you install your cards drivers.

    Vulkan RT is Vulkan runtime.

    Vulkan can work on all platforms.
    DX 12 can only work on windows 10.

    Right now, there are only a few things running on Vulkan, and in a few years, you will see more.
     
  8. burfadel

    burfadel MDL EXE>MSP/CAB

    Aug 19, 2009
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    This depends on the interpretation of the meaning of 'replace'. It does replace OpenGL from an API point of view, exactly like DirectX 12 replacing DirectX 11. You aren't going to magically get DirectX 11 games running DirectX 12, likewise you aren't going to magically get OpenGL games running Vulkan. So yes, from an API point of view it replaces OpenGL as its successor, however it does not replace OpenGL in the sense that OpenGL games etc can use Vulkan.

    I'm not sure how well Vulkan will take off, it depends on game developers and whether they want to port to Windows DirectX 12 or whether they'll port games to Vulkan. This of course, should not affect PC only games, not that there are many big titles that are. Like I said earlier, to run Vulkan you essentially need DirectX 12 capable (DirectX 11_1 feature level and higher, confusing to some!) hardware. In a couple of years (say, 2018) when games start coming in with DirectX 12 and Vulkan full swing, the support for Windows 7 and 8.1 should really be redundant anyway. Guaranteed there will still be people refusing to move on, even if they do have a new high end computer, then whinge and complain about support etc, but that's just how the world works. The same people will likely be scrounging for the latest iOS or Android version on their phone.
     
  9. potjevleesch

    potjevleesch MDL Addicted

    Aug 7, 2010
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    #9 potjevleesch, Mar 11, 2016
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2016
    it's been silently installed with the latest nvdia 364.51, I uninstalled that bugger rightaway, no inpact whatsoever on gaming (gtx 970 Intel platform)
     
  10. Valiosa

    Valiosa MDL Novice

    Jul 20, 2015
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    Vulkan run time libraries were installed with latest nvidia whql driver. I hope game devs will use it over dx12, so I can keep my windows 7 os till 2020 :)