Enable or disable page file and why?

Discussion in 'Windows 8' started by M0rriss0n, Jul 16, 2013.

?

Enable or disable page file

  1. Enable

    12 vote(s)
    54.5%
  2. Disable

    10 vote(s)
    45.5%
  1. M0rriss0n

    M0rriss0n MDL Senior Member

    Sep 17, 2011
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    Enable or disable page file and why?
     
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  2. pisthai

    pisthai Imperfect Human

    Jul 29, 2009
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    NO Vote!

    Because it's an useless thread! The use or not-use of that Pagefile is depend on what you've to do with your computer. Some function may need that Pagefile, others don't!

    To find out anybody should or didn't should use the Pagefile, just test it and disable, run the computer for some wile and use all of your apps to see you loose performance or get any other bad outcome. There isn't any general solution of use or nopt to use the Pagefile. If you didn't know for sure you wont face problems because of that disabled file, just run the file to be assure that you get what you need!

    Just my 2 Satangs!
     
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  3. M0rriss0n

    M0rriss0n MDL Senior Member

    Sep 17, 2011
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    #3 M0rriss0n, Jul 16, 2013
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2013
    (OP)
    Enable or Disable and WHY.
    If you use arguments, a discussion is never useless.
     
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  4. NiFu

    NiFu MDL Member

    Jun 29, 2013
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    If I have enough RAM I disable "page file".

    "Page file" is not essentially necessary. Reason:
    • Microsoft disables "page file" per default in their operating system "Windows Thin PC" (which is a rudimentary "Windows 7 Ultimate").
    • If I install Windows 7 / 8 on a small partition (e.g. 10 GB) "page file" is per default disabled.
    So my conclusion: "Page file" is not essentially necessary.

    With "page file" Windows swaps previously used RAM parts to the "page file" of hard disk. For me the re-loading of exported RAM parts from "page file" of hard disk has the same speed as loading the needed programs parts direct from hard disk. So exporting to "page file" it only useless hard disk operating (SSD !). And only useful if you have low amount of physical RAM.

    An example:
    If you have 8 GB of RAM and have configured "page file" with min size of 20 MB and max size of 8 GB you will see that "page file" grows up by time from 20 MB to e.g. 2 GB. And this even if you never use the full 8 GB of physical RAM.
     
  5. M0rriss0n

    M0rriss0n MDL Senior Member

    Sep 17, 2011
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    At home:
    Windows 8 Pro 8 GB RAM Page file is system managed.
    No need to play with the setting as I got no SSD, and only use my PC for browsing, email, convert video files and act as a home server.

    At work:
    Test PC is an old Sempron based single core 1.8 Ghz with 1 GB RAM
    Windows 8.1 Preview Page file is on separate HDD, an old 10 GB Seagate, configured to start at 1024 MB and end at 9454 MB.
    The performance should have changed as it feels quicker.
     
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  6. MeMy&Myself

    MeMy&Myself MDL Junior Member

    Sep 5, 2012
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    One more time: Disable pagefile do not increase the performance of "new" pcs with, ironically, a lot of ram. Go and test it, and I mean a real test not "feels", it makes no difference even when the theory says otherwise.
     
  7. murphy78

    murphy78 MDL DISM Enthusiast

    Nov 18, 2012
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    Some programs run constantly in the background. Those programs, although seemingly filed away somewhere, are still in memory.
    When you don't count the programs and all of the associated data that has been loaded into ram into account, you don't take a full accounting of your available ram.
    A lot of programs, also, don't take a full accounting of available ram.

    When both situations happen, and they do, you will crash your system.
    Just leave it enabled. Think of it like an insurance scenario. It won't actually do much unless you run out of ram. When that happens, it will save your comp from crashing.
    That's what it's for.
     
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  8. NiFu

    NiFu MDL Member

    Jun 29, 2013
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    I don't say that disabling pagefile increase the performance. But also don't decrease performance if a lot of RAM is available.

    And why is "Windows Thin PC" pre configured with disabled pagefile ?
    Do you think that Microsoft delivers operating systems like "Windows Thin PC" with pre configured "crashable" configurations ?
     
  9. pisthai

    pisthai Imperfect Human

    Jul 29, 2009
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    AFAIK Thin PC is for 32bit only! Also the Kernel isn't the same as in Pro/Core! And there would be more differences! That version isn't created for public selling instead for the direct use by PC Manufacturers, special for Netbooks.
    Samr Thin PC Version were available for Windows 7 and even Vista!

    To compare such versions with full versions would show the real figure!
     
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  10. eydee

    eydee Guest

    Disabling it is crazy. It is there for a good reason. If you need disk space, you can set it to a low size (e.g. 128MB) and if the system needs more, it'll increase it.
     
  11. NiFu

    NiFu MDL Member

    Jun 29, 2013
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    I only have tested "Windows Thin PC" in Windows 7 version (I mentioned above) and as far as I know it has the same kernel like Windows 7 Ultimate.

    Does it make any difference ?
    Or do you want to say: Disabling page file on 32 bit systems can make sense - but not on 64 bit systems ?
     
  12. shot²

    shot² MDL Novice

    Feb 20, 2011
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    #12 shot², Jul 16, 2013
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2013
    Provided the system has comfortable memory and no (dumb) software that absolutely relies upon the presence of a pagefile, one of the few sensible uses for it has to do with crash reports under NT-based OSes. When a Stop condition is encountered, the system will dump the error state to that pagefile and parse it to a crash dump upon subsequent resumption. That's why it triggers a warning when manually disabling the pagefile, saying that you need to set a "minimum size for it in case of crash blah blah" (or something along these lines). The minimal space required, a few hundreds MB, varies according to the amount of Ram.
    A pagefile also slows down (slightly) a fresh boot as it is (re)initialized, but it's a matter of seconds with a large pagefile.

    So... for peace of mind, one could configure Windows to perform minimal crash dumps, reduce the pagefile size to the tiniest amount allowed, setting it to a constant filesize to avoid out-of-hand growth (sign of a broader issue, and no good remedy), while ensuring apps that absolutely need the presence of pagefile.sys are still happy.
     
  13. pisthai

    pisthai Imperfect Human

    Jul 29, 2009
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    Read my post's again and you've the answer! I don't like to repeat myself many times!
     
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  14. DJxSpeedy

    DJxSpeedy MDL Senior Member

    Jan 7, 2008
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    i disabled it..becorse i have 6GB of ram.. an ssd drive as systemdrive..i dont use big programs / programs that need an pagefile
    so i disabled it becorse i dont need it and my pc is fast without too and i save some space (ssd has only 64GB)
     
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  15. Cal-123

    Cal-123 MDL Novice

    Feb 19, 2011
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    I've got one older laptop with only 2 GB of memory and have run Win 8 Pro 32 bit with no page file on an SSD and had no problems. All no page does is supposedly save writes by the SSD. As an SSD will last longer than most of us will use it this is really an irrelevant discussion. Try with no page and see what happens.