Ge8600gt - ge8600gt oc - ge8600gts

Discussion in 'PC Hardware' started by comandoed, Feb 20, 2009.

  1. comandoed

    comandoed MDL Novice

    Feb 20, 2008
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    Which of the above should I get? I am not into gaming. Mostly for watching movies, DVD playback.
    I have Intel D975Xbx2, Q6600 and Vista. Dont want to spend more than $65 on video card. All of the
    above are under that.

    The GE8600Gt is 256mb core clock 540mhz. The GE8600Gt overclocked is 512MB. The GE8600GTs is
    256MB core clock 675mhz. All are DDR3 PNY Verto.
     
  2. HMonk

    HMonk MDL Addicted

    Nov 3, 2008
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    Components

    I do not look at gfx cards in a vacuum since, to me, more than any other component, they are an integral part of the system. Questions: what is your present monitor; any near future plans to update monitor; specifically (mfg/model), what is you PSU?

    Monk
     
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  3. comandoed

    comandoed MDL Novice

    Feb 20, 2008
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    PSU is Corsair VX550w. The monitor I currently use is a 17" Dell crt
    but I'll be getting a Dell 22" flat screen.

    I would probably be converting movies using ConvertXtoDvd.
     
  4. HMonk

    HMonk MDL Addicted

    Nov 3, 2008
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    Better 7900

    If memory serves, the 8600 was a mid-end DX10 capable card - a stepped down 8800 (NVIDIA's rush to outdo ATI in late 2007 re budget users).

    The loaded card draws in the neighborhood of 190W and should be OK in a 550W system. It is also is HDCP capable if you wish to connect an external DVD/movie source to your PC. Other than that, the 8600 is really a mediocre offering by today's standards and was rated as average by most reviewers in its day. Your mobo and CPU is more capable than the 8600, and both will likely be insulted by its presence. Oh, mobo is ATI but not SLI capable; the 8600 is an SLI-type card. Regardless, you have not stated a need for either.

    IF you want to stay with NVIDIA and at this level, I invite you read about the 7900 released in 2006 and very highly rated. It is not DX10 capable but you apparently would have no use for that. I searched the Net and found that you can get this card for about $75; a far superior performer v. the 8600.

    Whatever you buy, make sure the card can run the native resolution of the monitor you anticipate getting. The 7900 will handle most anything up to about 2500 x 1600 digital (I don't have the exact numbers).

    In the end, I think you are wise to tailor your card to your needs. But I would suggest researching the card's capabilities in the light of those needs (and anticipated monitor - by flat screen I assume you mean LCD - and that's a buying challenge). There are many good tech sites that rate cards (all hardware) and I would suggest you read a few reviews; although they rely on game performance to a greater degree, you can get a good idea of what you are getting.

    Monk
     
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  5. comandoed

    comandoed MDL Novice

    Feb 20, 2008
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    Thanks Monk.

    I am reading your advice very carefully. Good to have people like you.:D
     
  6. HMonk

    HMonk MDL Addicted

    Nov 3, 2008
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    #6 HMonk, Feb 21, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: May 23, 2017
    Thanks

    Thanks for the kudos; I try.

    If/when you decide to upgrade your monitor you might be interested in some observations I made in these two threads, which cover some of the technical considerations related to monitors.

    http://forums.mydigitallife.net/threads/3853

    http://forums.mydigitallife.net/threads/4427

    Depending on what I am doing and what advances are made, I build a new machine, on average, about every three years. In the first place, technically, it is very easy to do. Secondly, although it takes a bit of time to learn the jargon and research the importance/significance of the specs, especially as they apply to individual needs, it is easy enough to sort through what's available and narrow the choices to a very few options. Finally, configuring the system is, to me, the most challenging, especially if BIOS modding has a role in the final result that one seeks (although more and more even these tasks are becoming automated); MyDigital is an excellent resource to assist with modding.

    I think it is worth noting, again, that any hardware upgrade is best viewed in relation to the entire system and there you are on the right track. And one more thing that I probably do not need to mention but . . . I like to build a machine that will last me (according to my biases and appetite for things improved) at least the three years I mentioned. Now that's hard to gauge but you can read about coming innovations/upgrades and make an educated guess as to what is worth waiting for - which is not necessarily the biggest or fastest (read, most expensive).

    For instance, I use AMD CPUs: they are much less expensive than comparable Intel and even in situations where an Intel CPU is a better performer, if I don't need the performance, why spend the bucks. For example, I recently upgraded to the Phenom II X3 720. Why, especially since the X4 940 is out? Well, for gaming it's a better processor and cost $100 less; as yet not many games/progs are written to take advantage of four cores; it runs cooler than the X4 (94W v. 126W); and it is an overclocking honey.

    Finally, you can budget out your purchases. If you have an OK gfx card at the present and, if after further investigation, you decide on a more capable card, no problem: skip a few pizzas and beer for a month or so and there's the extra $40 bucks for the better card. In the least, do a bit of LCD research and get an idea of what you might be getting; the card you buy today should manage the LCD you buy tomorrow. Be a shame to find the "right" monitor in September and discover that the card you bought yesterday cannot manage its capabilities - effectively doubling your cost of the card.

    Gads, I'm sounding like a grandfather . . .

    Monk
     
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