I love Linux Mint, Been using it for 6 months, but need some help.. :)

Discussion in 'Linux' started by Hugefiang, Sep 27, 2018.

  1. Hugefiang

    Hugefiang MDL Novice

    Aug 17, 2018
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    Linux mint 19 is great, stable and fast for my old computer xD.. But i want some things faster, look nice'r and cleaner..

    I want a clean Black theme (that doesn't make firefox also black)..

    I've used Papirus icon Theme, but if you know something better of cleaner let me know..

    I've decreased my Boot time with 1 minute and 30 seconds now it boots completely in 45 seconds.. quit nice but i want faster xD.. any ideas are always welcome..

    I want some Commands to clean Linux mint once a month.. i hate Cleaner programs they are garbage btw..

    How can i get rid of all that Green stuff (Colors, etc) iknow Green is good for your eyes but its to much xD..

    I've used all tutorials to speed up Linux mint 19 and it works, but if you know better tweaks let me know..

    I've heard that you can let Linux mint 19 boot with the full processor power, like in Windoze.. but how?

    I have 4GB RAM, is that enough for Linux mint 19?

    What services, programs can i Safely delete or disable to increase my Boot time or speed up my OS..

    And do i still need an AV in 2018.. I only have (PPA) Papirus icon Theme installed, and all my other apps are installed from the store on the Distro.

    Do you know some nice themes, etc let me know!

    Cheers! :)
     
  2. Yen

    Yen Admin
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  3. Dude Guyman

    Dude Guyman MDL Junior Member

    Jun 20, 2017
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    #3 Dude Guyman, Sep 27, 2018
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2018
    I'll take a stab at this, and it's totally just my opinion, if you really like Cinnamon or something, just disregard my comments...

    1. Cinnamon, Mate, or Xfce? If Cinnamon, switch to Xfce (or Mate). Cinnamon is clunky and sluggish by comparison.
    2. From an Xfce user (may be different on the others, I don't use them) Go to Sessions and Startup and uncheck any programs you don't want starting at boot. Like if you do not use Bluetooth, printer, Nvidia optimus, uncheck them. It would be a tiny improvement but...Linux is already about as fast as it can get, there is not much tweaking to be done like in Windows. As mentioned, an SSD is about the best thing you can do these days.
    3. Themes. Mint has always been pretty dull looking to me and most themes or icon sets will have something I like better but something else I hate. That said (if Xfce), fire up Synaptic and get xfwm4-themes package plus Numix-blue theme if it's not already in the xfwm4-themes pack (I think it only came with an ugly red version when I tried it, and assuming a windows-like blue would be preferable to green, red, etc to you). That will give you many more theme options. As for icons, I've always liked the plain old Gnome or Adwaita ones best, they don't replace Firefox, VLC, etc icons with strange looking custom ones. I like the Mint-red (selected text, not icons) over the Mint-green for the default theme, assuming something in xfwm4-themes doesn't float your boat.

    That's about all I've got. I dumped Mint (Xfce) for Xubuntu (Xfce) when Mint started adding their own Xapps and other bloat I didn't care for. Not to mention Mint is months behind on getting updated Ubuntu releases into Mint. For example Ubuntu 18.04.1 came out in July(?) and Mint (19 = 18.04) is just now posting about "Linux Mint 19.1 is estimated to be released around November/December 2018" which will be their take on 18.04.1 I would imagine.
     
  4. Hugefiang

    Hugefiang MDL Novice

    Aug 17, 2018
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    I use Cinnamon, but i have also tried XFCE.. but i want to give XFCE again a shot to go, but i can't find much tweakings for XFCE, like Mint.. Hmm.. How long do you use XFCE already, and is it really enough stable, lightweight.. because in MInt i play some virtual games on Google chrome and it fills up my 4GB RAM quickly and turns on the swap partition which is a pain in the ass, will this happen if i use XFCE also? :/ if you know some little tweaks or things to speed up in XFCE, i will give XFCE a try :) Xubuntu is the same as Ubuntu, so XFCE will gets updated really fast every day right? if i fall in love with XFCE again, i hope they never give up XFCE.. like they did with Lubuntu :/
    Because some people may think XFCE is dead.. and need to be replaced lol..

    Cheers!
     
  5. Dude Guyman

    Dude Guyman MDL Junior Member

    Jun 20, 2017
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  6. Yen

    Yen Admin
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  7. Nimbus2000

    Nimbus2000 MDL Member

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    Newer version of Mint use xed for the default editor.
     
  8. John Sutherland

    John Sutherland MDL Addicted

    Oct 15, 2014
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  9. sayopara

    sayopara MDL Novice

    Sep 24, 2018
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    What do you like most in Mint ? Because I personnaly can't bear it anymore
     
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  10. LastRaven

    LastRaven MDL Novice

    Sep 30, 2018
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    You should try XFCE/LXQT or OpenBox (slightly complex).
    They are very resource efficient and appropriate for old PCs.
    It's true that XFCE hasn't had much development progress, thus people call it "dead" and what not, but what is there to change? If it ain't broke, don't fix it.
    Mint hasn't had a good track record in security and other stuff though, and while it's friendly, I'd suggest moving to something like Xubuntu/Lubuntu.
     
  11. sayopara

    sayopara MDL Novice

    Sep 24, 2018
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    XFCE along MATE are probably the most stable DE, never had a crash on it, but they need compton to suppress tearing.
     
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  12. VDev

    VDev MDL Junior Member

    Sep 9, 2015
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    @Hugefiang 4GB is enough for smooth operation on XFCE4.x. I personally use Xubuntu 18 on high end machine and low end because its simple and intuitive UI. Gnome is heavy sometimes. Its better to clean install if you're trying different DE.
    You can add some extra RAM too if you like Gnome and others. Only downside to xfce is lack of HiDPI scaling. Gnome simply kills it anyday. I took nearly 2 hours to make icons bigger for HiDPI sort of, its FHD display.
     
  13. ThomasMann

    ThomasMann MDL Expert

    Dec 31, 2015
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    Just a question for my own information.
    Your start up time of 1 min 30 sec sounds ridiculous. Are you using an HDD or an SSD?
    I am thinking of installing mint on my laptop to learn, but if it is taking that long with an SSD, than I will simply forget it at once....

    Thanks...
     
  14. Yen

    Yen Admin
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    #14 Yen, Oct 5, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2018
    He must still have a real slow HDD.

    Mint boots way faster than w7. Furthermore it shuts down way faster.

    From grub (bootmanager) to login screen it takes less than 10 seconds (SATA III)....Kubuntu as well far below 10 seconds..I'd guess 6 seconds to login and 1-2 more to get to desktop after entering PW.

    On old PCs the P.O.S.T. takes similar time in advance.

    And what matters most using an encrypted partition is the time you need to enter your unlock password. LUKS encrypted volumes are booting fast as well...what takes a bit more time is to get to unlock volume screen (after kernel has booted).....
     
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  15. ThomasMann

    ThomasMann MDL Expert

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    Speed is not really the issue, my Win 7 takes eight seconds until Ff opens.
    I am always torn between the comfort of Win 7 and my dislike of anything MS.
    I am reading Linux in Easy Steps, 6th Edition by Mike Mcgrath right now... looks very easy and usable so far. Maybe on the next rainy day I will try the Mint/Cinnamon combination on my second laptop, seems that is the best combination for a windows user. Its always good to learn new things.
    And just in case....I will keep a Win 7 copy if I want to return there...
     
  16. Yen

    Yen Admin
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    #16 Yen, Oct 6, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2018
    This is the right approach.
    We are talking about an event that takes time. It's about changing old (rational) habits. It's no replacement (taking away common stuff) at first place.

    The Linux distro is an addition first. And I always recommend dual boot / dual use together with the 'common' OS.

    It's about getting old habits along with alternatives to recognize that 'new' OS can be an enrichment.
    Fun doing that has to be 'the counterpart' of the perceived 'efforts'.
    If the latter is prevailing there is no process of a long term change.

    I do not want to annoy you with psychological stuff but...

    I am speaking of own experiences. My first try for Ubuntu was 8 years ago. Did not 'convince'. I stuck to win.
    Getting familiar with Android (which is Linux related), an own Linux based server and with the aversion to w10 there was 'enough' fun to make the change on desktop PC at home.
    It's never a complete change, though. My profession requires to administrate windows clients as well.

    But I take MDL as a place where we have the opportunity to get people here where they can contribute to that matter. Also people who feel uncomfortable at 'Nix forums for whatever own reasons. And we are a few already contributing here.

    Linux has become a major part of MDL literally MY digital life. :)
    I use win whenever I have to use my paid win apps. (Also my paid win games)
    And most scientific apps we're running are windows apps. One device (NMR) runs completely on a Linux distro, though.

    At home I am booting Kubuntu (90%) already. It's fun and a real alternative, but still with the issues I have posted already. Mint IMO is the most recommended for newcomers, though. It ever was reliable when I used it.

    Feel free to post whenever you have questions about Mint. I have used it until July (2 years) and now I am on Kubuntu. Wanted to have new fancy and cool looking KDE plasma desktop. :D

    Whenever I have got new info about the Linux distro I currently used I contributed (Nvidia blank screen Mint 17 etc, etc)....also about useful workarounds.
     
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  17. ThomasMann

    ThomasMann MDL Expert

    Dec 31, 2015
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    I of course understand your "psychological" argument, but it does not really work here. Too many MS problems are getting on my nerves and so I always have more than just the necessary motivation to switch to Linux... Suse, Debian Ubuntu, Mint... tried them all.
    My aversion to Linux stems from the fact that I do not "work" with computers, I use them as a medium for my usual daĆ­ly interests, which is easy with Windows. Using Linux, every day you have stop what you actually want to do, and as a beginner waste plenty of time to learn how to do the simplest things (simplest on Win). And that usually mostly because of the lack of good will to help in Linux Forums, and their utterly incapability as far as didactics goes. Their explanations usually use a lingo that only someone will understand who already knows, and would have not have to ask that question in the first place.
    Anything that might be resolved in two minutes requires eight mails and in my case, having to get a new account under a different name there, because I get banned, because I have an allergy to stupidty :mad:
    But then....Those were my pre-MDL days.

    Next rainy day... I will start on Mint Cinnamon... :cool:
     
  18. ThomasMann

    ThomasMann MDL Expert

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    As I assumed, I am back.
    I rufussed the Mint-iso and wanted to install it, once I was asked. What I was not asked was WHERE I wanted to install ist, as there are two SSDs inside the computer, the C: with Win 7 installed, the other E: empty and ready for Linux.
    How do I proceed?
     
  19. Yen

    Yen Admin
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    Drives such as SSDs are reported natively by the BIOS / SATA bus. Anything 'later' such as drive letters are mounts of created partitions already.

    Since I did no backup of windows and wanted to be absolutely sure I install it on the new SSD I unplugged any other SSD/HDD first before I ran the live boot session. (Better safe than sorry). Then I have chosen "Erase disk and install Linux mint".
    By doing that I could play without to be worried about mistakes. I still do it that way when I re-install.
    If you have 2 SSDs plugged I guess it will let choose you on which one after you have selected "Erase disk and install Linux mint" and continued...but that I have NOT tried.

    After installation I plugged all drives again. I am using the BIOS boot menu which OS to boot otherwise as default which is Linux. This method does not write an own boot menu entry for win (grub).

    My PC boots to Linux when doing nothing. When pressing F8 to call the BIOS boot order menu I can choose.

    If you are familiar with 'Nix naming of devices and want to have full manual control of partitioning choose "Something Else".
    You need to be absolutely sure to identify the right (empty SSD). This can be a bit of challenge when having the same SSD twice.

    Each device gets another letter starting from a
    /dev/sda
    /dev/sdb

    Partitions on those then get additional numbers
    /dev/sda1
    /dev/sda2

    The numbers sda1-4 are reserved for "primary" partitions.
     
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  20. ThomasMann

    ThomasMann MDL Expert

    Dec 31, 2015
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    Thank you, good information.
    The disks have different sizes, so they would be easy to distinguish... but only if asked, of course.
    So I will unplug the other one.

    And thank you for telling me the basics about sda and sdb, and sda1 and sda2... something that Linux people would never do, they assume everyone on the planet knows things like that... which makes their forums so useless so often.