i72600K & Asus P8P67 LE (B3)

Discussion in 'Windows 7' started by loggerman, Mar 27, 2011.

  1. loggerman

    loggerman MDL Novice

    Apr 21, 2010
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    Bonjour,
    Has anyone managed to get a good and stable overclock with this combination, P8P67 LE motherboard, i72600K cpu, 8GB Corsair Vengeance DDR3 PC12800 ? I have tried all ways without success. I should have stayed with my i7920, if I can't overclock the 2600K there doesn't seem to be any difference !! HELP.
     
  2. loggerman

    loggerman MDL Novice

    Apr 21, 2010
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    Thanks for the link, have also used the AI suite auto tuning to some success until I rebooted, it told me "overclocking was unsuccessful press F1 to reset". I am not happy with the set-up at all, perhaps it will get better when there is more info going around. Be good.
     
  3. burfadel

    burfadel MDL EXE>MSP/CAB

    Aug 19, 2009
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    Have you updated the bios, if not already?

    Have you tried the BIOS options for overclocking it could be more beneficial.

    In the bios, first set AI tuner to manual, so all the options are changeable and reboot! thats right, just so you can see if on manual it works (it should).

    If it doesn't work, try finding the conflicting setting. Its probably something very simple! I take it its 2x4GB modules, not 4x2gb?

    Check the voltage requirements. I believe the Intel's don't like overvolting (can fry the memory controller), so keep in within Intel Spec. Also the default timing for the Vengeance of that speed is 9-9-9-24, so make sure its not already super tweaked :) you can go lower than that even if tweaked, but its good to start high, overclock, and work your way back through effective settings.
     
  4. loggerman

    loggerman MDL Novice

    Apr 21, 2010
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    Bios version 1003, 02/11/2011, memory is 2x 4GB sticks at 1.50000v and 1648 Mhz, cpu voltage 1.264, speed 3521Mhz and temp in bios says 35C idle and in AI suite it says 23C, I have BCLK 103.0 and a 43x multi, it seems stable at this but I am still confused, I think old age is creeping in !!
     
  5. burfadel

    burfadel MDL EXE>MSP/CAB

    Aug 19, 2009
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    There's two ways to read the temperature. The temperature of the cores (usually core 0 is the one that is stated if not all of them), and the temperature of the CPU casing. The temperature of the CPU casing should be lower, as heat is drawn away by the heatsink. AI suite probably reads the CPU casing, asuming the sensors are being read correctly :)

    I believe the CPU can cope with a little more memory voltage than that, was it 1.625V or 1.675V? 1.5V may be the stock voltage at 1600mhz, but you may need a tad more to push it further.

    Also, idle temps don't necessarily mean much, although if they're high there's cause for concerns. I'd also be worried if the room temp is 40C and the computer CPU temperature were lower! assuming you're not using water cooling, refrigerated cooling, or nitrogen cooling!

    A temp of 23C is pretty low, is that in a 20C or less room?

    Three things people may forget when overclocking. The first is running the CPU flat out for a while and keeping an eye on temperature, whilst still ensuring stability. Prime95 is fairly common to use. The second thing is considering the maximum temperature the room is likely to get. If you are in a nice cold room because its winter, and its say, 15C or less (if you are like me and after aclimatising feeling comfortable in 5C or 45C, as long as its a dry heat), then you have to consider the difference in temperatures. An overclock that stays nice and cool at 15C might not do the same at 27C! (or even less difference than that). You need to again run prime95 in that scenario.

    The last consideration is probably the most overlooked, and thats the effect of the overclock and temperatures on other components. RAM can get pretty hot, which is why they have a nice heatsink on them :) good airflow across the RAM is important. Good airflow across the board is also important as the chipsets can get extremely hot! - those big heatsinks, spreaders, and even heatpipes on the more expensive boards aren't there just for show! And finally, a critical component when it comes to temperature, and this is an arguable point apparently but I stand by my statement, is the hard drives! All that excess heat in the case would be bad if it were flowing over the HDD area due to poor air flow. The HDD can have up to 5 (typically 2 or 3) platters in them, spinning at 7200rpm (5400rpm for some eco drives, which despite what people do should not be used as system drives)! and have heads that are microscopically close to the platter surface. Also the drives are magnetic (unless you have an SSD drive) and magnetics and heat don't mix... a drive shouldn't get hot enough to start causing data loss due to the effects of heat on magnetics, but it is a consideration and may over time possibly be an issue... in any case, things typically expand when hot, which can cause those heads to get to close to the drive surface... or cause wear on the motor. Due to the spinning speed, anything that is slightly off can cause higher than normal vibration... which can increase the wear on the drive, you get the picture! Good airflow across the drives is vital!

    Conpletely separate consideration, power profiles may not do drives any good either. A drive that turns off after 5 minutes and continually spins up and down due to use or folder browsing etc won't do it any good! The MTBF (Mean Time Before Failure) is the average life expectancy of a product under ideal conditions. For computer hard drives, these are around 500,000 hours give or take for a desktop drive. Thats 500,000 hours runnning! Ideal conditions is being nice and cool, vibration free, little use, and not starting and stopping all the time. Thats 57 years, and 216 billion revolutions! of course these claims are a little exaggeratted by manufacturers (unless you got 57 years to test their claims), but truthfully, if you look after them, keep the temps down, don't thrash them (drive overuse, like superfetch can cause and does cause in Vista), keep the spin-ups and downs to a minimum, and make sure their vibration is absorbed, you should have them last several years continuous use no worries :) and they'll be due for replacement for something better long before stuffing up or causing data errors!
     
  6. loggerman

    loggerman MDL Novice

    Apr 21, 2010
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    Struth !!!! my poor little head is spinning. Using Corsair H50 for cpu + 2 case fans (1 inlet 1 exhaust) also 120GB Vertex2. Thanks for taking the time to explain things to an old fart like me !
     
  7. regal

    regal MDL Member

    Aug 26, 2009
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    I bought a Sandy Bridge also, but the H67 chipset cause really I don't see any reason or need to overclock at this point. The CPU Vcc maximum on these new CPU's is really not nailed down. I guess what I am saying is you may want to consider not overclocking, when there is software developed that actually need more cpu power than the stock sandy bridge can deliver folks will have overclocking these CPU's down to a safe science. Also your board being only 4 phase is not the best or safest choice for overclocking.