Is an LG LCD Monitor better & stable or a Benq LCD?

Discussion in 'PC Hardware' started by apoorvasheth, Dec 18, 2008.

  1. apoorvasheth

    apoorvasheth MDL Junior Member

    Jul 25, 2008
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  2. HMonk

    HMonk MDL Addicted

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    #3 HMonk, Dec 18, 2008
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2008
    Google is offline . . .

    Where do I began, Apoor . . .

    Response time in milliseconds has primarily to do with moving images. For the average user, it is of little importance because the majority of monitors have a response time of <10ms. Gamers (me) prefer faster response times because most games have fast moving graphics. Regardless of how fast the response time is, one will see ghosting (double images) as objects fly across the screen. It's like looking at cursor tails. The faster the response time, the less noticeable the ghosting. So-called gaming monitors have response times of 2ms, although many say anything below 8ms is OK. Defined: response time is the time it takes for a pixel to change color or brightness.

    GTG: gray-to-gray. Gray-to-gray response time is the time that it takes for a pixel to twist from some arbitrary gray position to another arbitrary gray position. Simplified, it defines how fast a change is made from one shade of gray to another - v. changing from black to white, which is always faster because more voltage is applied to the pixels changing from black to white. Thus GTG response times are slower.

    CR: Contrast Ratio. A measurement of the ratio of the blackest and whitest that a monitor can display.

    DCR: Dynamic Contrast Ratio: utilizes dynamic adjustments of backlighting in an attempt to achieve better black or dark levels without undue influence by coexisting highlights.

    When interpreting response times and contrast ratios, one must be aware that they are terribly subjective - especially contrast ratios. Another consideration/extraneous influence is ambient room lighting under which one is viewing the monitor. Most monitors advertise a CR of 1000:1 but DCR range from 5k to >20k. I personally, and I think it a consensus amongst reviewers is to place less importance on DCR - again, because they are especially subjective values.

    HDCP: acronym: High-Bandwidth Digital Content Protection and has to do with copywrite protection by the movie industry. Basically, that which produces the signal (DVD ROM, e.g.) must have a secure handshake to a compliant display. The source device queries the monitor to see if it is compliant. If it is not, no images will be shown.

    Gloss finish: you are misinterpreting what glossy refers to - which has nothing to do with being attractive. Screens can either be flat or glossy both of which will often have an anti-glare coating, regardless. Essentially, glossy screens produce richer colors at a higher contrast ratio. If you have ever seen them side-by-side, it is comparable to comparing a glossy photograph with one that has a matte finish. Here the issue is a matter of preference. I would note, however, that glossy screens are like mirrors: they reflect the background. So, if your background has a lot of white or bright objects, you could be annoyed by their reflection on the screen.

    As far as warranties are concerned, three years is good. Regardless of the warranty, this, that, or the other could go wrong in any monitor, at any time. Electronic gadgets are very well made these days but stuff happens.

    By the way, most LCD panels are made by a very few manufacturers. To my knowledge, people like LG, Benq, Samsung, etc. do not make their own panels. So, comparing one brand to another often compares identical panels with each other.

    There are other things to learn: DVI-D v. DVI-I, Dual v. single link, HDMI support, etc.

    Now for my unsolicited advice.

    First and foremost, ask yourself the question: what is going to be the primary use of my monitor? Your answer will govern your choice of CR, response time, panel size, HDMI, etc, etc. Secondly, whatever the monitor, will your graphics card support it? For example, if yours will be a 16:10 aspect ratio, 1680:1050 native resolution monitor, will your card support it? If not, then you need to upgrade your card. Will your present machine support an upgraded (presumably a PCI-E) card (are the expansion slots PCI, PCI-E, AGP)? Will your power supply be sufficient to support your card? Many cards call for a minimum of 750 watts. Hey, does your power supply have the right type of connectors for your card?

    So many questions need be answered that I would not suggest looking at an LCD monitor in the abstract.

    That said, I am a gamer and have an LG L227WTG connected to a Radeon 4830 graphics card in a custom machine. The L227 has a 22-inch, glossy, anti-reflective screen, with a 300cd/m2 brightness; native resolution is 1680:1050 with a 16:10 aspect ratio; CR is 10,000:1; response time 2ms; it has DVI-D and D-sub (analog) connections and is HDCP compliant. What I especially like is that it has what LGE calls "Wide Color Gamut" for improved color renditioning. It's so-called Flatron f-Engine adjusts contrast and brightness independently and has four easily adjusted presets for movie, text, normal (general use), and user defined. The monitor comes with "forteManager" software that enables the user to very easily adjust all of the monitor's settings.

    If memory serves me, the difference between the L227 and the L2252 is that the L2252 has a matte screen and a slightly different color rendering engine. I prefer the glossy screen because I feel the color rendering is far better. I am not troubled by glare or reflections because my computer room does not produce any. If one is that fussy, darken the room, watch movies at night, etc.

    Finally, you may note that some reviewers talk about text quality being some what compromised and that one is apt to experience eye fatigue viewing LCD monitors for extended periods. Nonsense! When I am not gaming, I'm writing (4-5 hours a day) and I have never experienced eye fatigue.

    One other thing: you are looking at a panel that is 18.75 inches wide (22 inches diagonal). You will read posts from some who complain about color/brightness shifts of monitors at the edges. Not so!!! If you sit much closer than 24 inches from the monitor, you will be looking at the sides at an increased viewing angle - which causes apparent color/brightness shifts. I sit about 30 inches from my panel and the images are consistent from one side to the other.

    Long story, bottom line: what will your primary use be? Build around that making sure that your machine can support the necessary card and the card can support the monitor.

    In a word, do a bit of research about all of the features and buy what you need.

    Let me know if you have other questions.

    Monk
     
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  3. apoorvasheth

    apoorvasheth MDL Junior Member

    Jul 25, 2008
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    Reply to your questions asked.

    Hello HMonk!

    First & foremost, I would like to thank you from the bottom of my heart for spending so much of your valuable time and efforts into posting such a long answer to my query, and that too in details! Thanks for such an excellent efforts! Cheers!

    Many of your questions asked became very important for me and thankfully drawn my attention towards things that I never thought of before and therefore could never investigate into it such as "if my Graphics card will support the Benq LCD monitor?".

    Well, here are the answers to your questions asked so that it clarifies your doubts and any further questions if you would like to ask me and that can benefit me...you know.

    Q. What is going to be the primary use of my monitor?

    Ans: I’ll be using this LCD to watch movies, play 3d games such as Need For Speed, browse internet, use Photoshop CS4 / CS3 applications at time, but not for that hardcode image editing, listen to music, etc…

    Q. Will your graphics card support it?

    Ans: I am not sure about this one…maybe if you could kindly check this out for me which includes “Resolution, Aspect Ratio” support. I use Nvidia GeForce 7300LE graphics card. Also, could you let me know if this graphics card supports a resolution of 1920 x1080 that this Benq LCD has to offer? Also, Benq has 16:9 and not 16:10.

    Q. Will your present machine support an upgraded (presumably a PCI-E) card?

    Well, I am using Asrock Conroe 945G-DVI motherboard which does have a PCI-E port.

    Q. Will your power supply be sufficient to support your card?

    Ans: Well, my power supply is from 1 Point and Model stated as ATX – 450W, therefore I assume that this power supply has a capacity of supplying 450W…not sure. However, I have been using this NVIDIA GeForce 7300LE Graphics Card on this Asrock motherboard on Vista with the same power supply without any issues.

    Q. Many cards call for a minimum of 750 watts…

    Ans: According to you, will my Nvidia GeForce 7300LE call for 750 Watts? How to check this out?

    Q. Hey, does your power supply have the right type of connectors for your card?

    Ans: As far as I understand, I have never seen my Nvidia Graphics Card getting connected to the Power Supply with any kind of a connector. Should it be?

    Again, thanks for your wonderful help! And apologize for replying late…;)

    Regards,
    Apoorva.
     
  4. Yen

    Yen Admin
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    #5 Yen, Dec 27, 2008
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2008
    Getting a new LCD monitor, a special thing.........

    When you've decided to buy new components regarding PC, a monitor is the hardest part. Why?

    You can read a lot about it, you may inform, but it's nothing about like to have a real look at it and test it.
    I don't know what's about India, but at some Countries the consumer has the right to order a device, to test it 10 days and if it's not good, you may send it back, money back guarantee.

    You are looking every time on the monitor if you have to use the PC. It should be a good looking one, stylish, yes.

    But the main aspect is the picture quality. Did you ever walk through a huge store and had a look at monitor after monitor, placed in a long row?
    The DIFFERENCES are big!!! There are monitors with a real ugly quality.

    Well I'm sitting in front of a BenQ, still a 4:3 one, glossy.
    I like glossy as well, the pros and cons are already said by HMonk.

    This BenQ is great, it's mine.:)
    But I wouldn't say ALL BenQ monitors are great. Every manufacturer has its good ones and its bad ones. (Even EIZO)

    That's why IMO it's so important to have a real look at it. You may build a good PC without to test any component before (only informed about at forums) and I'm sure it will be a good one.

    But the picture of a LCD you have to see with your own eyes...............and personally decide if it's attractive for you and your usage.
    Another thing are possible dead pixels, sometimes annoying, I don't know if it's still a matter at manufacturing process. Some shops offer a dead pixel free guarantee, just for a few bucks more to pay.
     
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  5. HMonk

    HMonk MDL Addicted

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    #6 HMonk, Dec 27, 2008
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2008
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  6. apoorvasheth

    apoorvasheth MDL Junior Member

    Jul 25, 2008
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    Hey, also I would like to ask that though this Benq e2200HD has an HDMI Connection port, but will my Asrock 945G0DVI Motherboard support it? The specification page does mention about HDMR slot but that's not HDMI. Therefore, could you suggest which is the best motherboard to go for with for an excellent performance and with an HDMI option? Also should support the latest DDR3 technology and latest graphics card from NVIDIA.

    To talk about graphics card, which one is the best to go for among NVIDIA & ATI RADEON?

    Though NVIDIA Graphics Card are more widely being used in India but when it comes to its replacement, I am sorry to say but I experienced the worse!!!! They took about 3 months just to replace my Graphics Card, can you imagine that? I did fight with their laws, Consumer Courts in all possible way I could and they were located in Hong Kong since the final replacement was to be done by Galaxy Tech from Hong Kong but all my efforts went in vain and to make it worse for me, Consumer Court in Hong Kong (that is mean to help a consumer) instead put the entire blame on me. I pray to god that nobody else face the same problems that I had to for getting my graphics card replaced.
     
  7. HMonk

    HMonk MDL Addicted

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    Already answered

    1. I already answered you question re HDCP above. :confused:

    2. HDMI has nothing to do with HDCP;

    3. HDMI is a gfx function, not a mobo function unless you are talking about a mobo's integrated gfx.

    4. When considering a mobo, consider it as a part of a whole; the other critical parts are CPU and RAM. The three enjoy an intimate relationship which cannot be separated. Apart from that, unless you are getting into SLI or Crossfire, I do not think that mobo choice matters.

    5. What you seek - the best - is not available. We all choose based upon individual needs; what is best is what is best for me.

    6. I suggest that there are no answers to your other questions, i.e., technology is advancing at such a rapid pace that what looks to be coming over the horizon may be outdated by the time it gets here.

    7. You have at your disposal all of the tools we have. As I did in a previous post, I urge you to research the subject(s) in which you are interested, read tech and user reviews, and best-fit your choice to your needs.

    Monk
     
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