Linux Mint cant boot because of missing partition

Discussion in 'Linux' started by Uboatfreak, Apr 20, 2018.

  1. Uboatfreak

    Uboatfreak MDL Novice

    Sep 3, 2017
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  2. Nimbus2000

    Nimbus2000 MDL Member

    May 5, 2010
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    Unfortunately, it appears that when you formatted /home, it erased the entire Linux install. You can make /home a separate partition but by default it is part of the root.
     
  3. Uboatfreak

    Uboatfreak MDL Novice

    Sep 3, 2017
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    My /home partition was separate than the root partition, so I do not see how it would delete the entire Linux install.
     
  4. John Sutherland

    John Sutherland MDL Addicted

    Oct 15, 2014
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    Hello @Uboatfreak and welcome to the My Digital Life forums. While it would be possible to edit /etc/fstab and mount that partition(/dev/nvme0n1p9) automatically during boot, the real problem is that when you formatted it the first time, you eradicated the /home directory as well. Since I don't think it's possible to restore or rebuild the directory, I would recommend deleting all of your existing Linux partitions and start over with a clean install.

    One tip before you begin installation: After you boot your Linux Mint installation media and are in a live CD session, you should mount the EFI system partition and open the folder "EFI". If I remember correctly (it's been a while), you will find two folders, one labelled "Unbuntu" and a second labelled "ubuntu". Delete both of them, then unmount the EFI system partition. If you don't do this, you will find duplicate entries in the grub boot menu after you perform the re-install. The entries created by your new install will work, but the ones created by your old install will not.

    I'm looking at your existing partition setup and have a concern and a question. I noticed /dev/nvme0n1p4(58.64GB) and /dev/nvme0n1p6(120GB) are both NTFS partitions. The first is your Windows C:\ system partition and the second is a NTFS partition that you created yourself, correct? If that's the case, your Windows C:\ partition is currently 80% full. If you're OK with that, then fine. But if you ever need to extend that partition, now is the time to do it, before you re-install Linux Mint. That's my concern.

    My question is what are you using that 120GB NTFS partition for? If it's not the Windows C:\ system partition, then you can use this existing partition as a shared data partition, provided that you created it using Windows Disk Management and assigned a drive letter so that it's recognized by Windows. After you re-install Linux Mint, your can create a new directory and then use nano to edit /etc/fstab and create a new mount point using the following steps:

    1.) Boot into Linux Mint and open the Terminal.

    2.) Create a new directory named Data(or whatever name you want) : sudo mkdir /media/Data

    3.) Mount the partition: sudo mount /dev/nvme0n1p6 /media/Data

    4.) Take ownership of the directory and mount point: sudo chown -R (your Linux username): /media/Data

    NOTE: Steps 5 & 6 are optional; skip to Step 7 if you have a different idea for folders

    5.) Change into the directory /media/Data(optional): cd /media/Data

    6.) Create new folders within the directory(optional): mkdir Documents Music Pictures Videos

    7.) Edit the file /etc/fstab: sudo nano /etc/fstab

    8.) Go to the bottom of the file and create a new entry as follows: UUID=E646F3DD46F3AC85 /media/Data ntfs-3g defaults,windows_names,locale=en_US.uft8 0 0

    9.) Close the file by pressing Ctrl + X, then enter "Y" to save the changes, then press "Enter" to exit

    10.) Upon rebooting into Linux Mint, this partition will automatically mount at boot. All files will be read/write in both Windows and Linux.

    NOTE: Never do this with your Windows C:\ system partition. Windows doesn't like it when your make changes to it's files behind it's back. You will be sorry.
     
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  5. Uboatfreak

    Uboatfreak MDL Novice

    Sep 3, 2017
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    Hello John Sutherland,

    Sorry for the late reply. Something happened the day afer I posted this and my attention was directed to other matters these past 2 weeks. I just want to say thank for your Linux Mint installation guide and for this very informative response. It helps me understand Linux better as I am noob at this. To answer your questions:

    1)I am perfectly fine with having my C partition 80% full. I wont install more things on it and it performs really well so I see no problems.
    2)That 120 GB partition is the partition I use for my files on Windows. At this point, out of the 74.5 GB of files it has, 74 GB is occupied by an installation of GTA 5. So I cant use it as the shared partition between Linux and Windows. Since I wont use it for anything besides GTA 5 and maybe some videos made in Premiere Pro in the future, I will probably shrink it to make more space for the shared partition and I will move the rest of my files there.

    Since the shared partition will be made in Linux, and not Windows as you gave those instructions for, do I have to do anything special to make it accessible in Linux?
     
  6. Uboatfreak

    Uboatfreak MDL Novice

    Sep 3, 2017
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    I made it a separate partition, so it was not part of root.