Microsoft's way of naming their ISO's?

Discussion in 'Windows 7' started by Oz, Mar 2, 2011.

  1. Oz

    Oz MDL Expert

    Sep 1, 2009
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    Is there an explanation of why Microsoft uses at least 3 different way's of naming an ISO, depending on from which branch it is sources?

    WZOR uses one way, not sure what that source is. Yeah yeah, I know Microsoft would like to know as well.
    Then Technet has their way, and their Volume division has another. ISO's are all the same.

    An example, (I know they are not 7) I have from all three is a Vista Business SP1 VOL.

    en_windows_vista_business_with_service_pack_1_x64_dvd_x14-56048.iso (Technet)
    SW_DVD5_Windows_Vista_Business_32BIT_English_32_Full_Int_MLF_X14-56028.ISO (Volume)
    6001.18000.080118-1840_amd64fre_Business_en-us_VL-FRMBXVOL_EN_DVD.iso (???????)

    All 3 have same SHA1.
     
  2. jjjhs

    jjjhs MDL Novice

    Dec 30, 2010
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    Sometimes Microsoft uses it themselves:
    microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?FamilyId=13C7300E-935C-415A-A79C-538E933D5424&displaylang=en

    6001.18000.080118-1840_amd64fre_Server_en-us-KRMSXFRE_EN_DVD.iso
    6001.18000.080118-1840_x86fre_Server_en-us-KRMSFRE_EN_DVD.iso
     
  3. Enigma256

    Enigma256 MDL Senior Member

    Jan 17, 2011
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    #3 Enigma256, Mar 2, 2011
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2011
    There are only two ways, really.

    The original name, generated by the build lab, starts with something like 6001.18000. It contains build details like the build number, the build time, the architecture (e.g., amd64), whether it's a debug build (either "chk" for checked/debug or "fre" for debug-free/release; the debug versions contain embedded debugging information and are not optimized by the compiler, thus making it easier to examine and trace in a debugger), the language, edition, and volume label. There are variations of this (e.g., for use with the WDK, SDK, WAIK, etc.).

    You'll see this name if you download an ISO from Microsoft Connect and sometimes from the Download Center. And leaked ISOs usually retain this original name.

    The production name, of which there are variations, contain information relevant to disc production. This includes a language code (e.g., "en" for English, "mu" for multi-language, etc.), whether this ISO is to be pressed to a DVD or CD, the product name, and most importantly, the SKU/catalog code (the code that someone would use when ordering a batch of discs from Microsoft), like X14-12345, which is stamped on the disc itself (buy Windows from the store, look at the disc, and you'll see a Xnn-nnnnn number that matches the one you see in TechNet or MSDN).
     
  4. vrosa

    vrosa MDL Member

    Jan 31, 2011
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    Thanks for the explanation Enigma256 :)
     
  5. Oz

    Oz MDL Expert

    Sep 1, 2009
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    Thanks for the info Enigma256.
    So WZOR knocks off his/hers copies from Microsoft Connect :cool:
    Guess we have a few choices for searching when looking for a certain release.
     
  6. Enigma256

    Enigma256 MDL Senior Member

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    #6 Enigma256, Mar 2, 2011
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2011
    Microsoft Connect was just an example of a place where Microsoft publicly (and sometimes privately) releases ISOs using their original build lab names. I don't know what goes on in the private Connect groups, but I don't think he gets it from there, since Connect is mostly used for beta testing.

    An build lab-named ISO can come from anywhere. A Microsoft employee downloading it from the internal servers, for example. Or stuff that's released to Microsoft's special partners. That his leak has the original build lab name just means that nobody had renamed it; it says nothing about the source.