My bios flash SCARE

Discussion in 'Windows 7' started by bdearen, Oct 21, 2009.

  1. bdearen

    bdearen MDL Junior Member

    Oct 3, 2009
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    so I did all the neccesary steps read up on everything including how to restore it ect.. I flashed my bios and prayed. After reboot my monitor woulnd't come back on which is usually a BAD sign when working with the bios. I power cycled it a few times and BAM I was back. The question I have is why are all my bios changes overclock/ram speeds/voltages ect.. saved still I thought when I installed the new bios it would erase all my bios settings any ideas?
     
  2. Michel

    Michel MDL Expert

    Jul 29, 2009
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    Clear cmos (or remove battery) and do load optimal settings in the bios. My pc had the same thing, saved all settings after a flash.
     
  3. bdearen

    bdearen MDL Junior Member

    Oct 3, 2009
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    hey michael your the one that modded my bios :p I don't really want to change anything I like that it preserved my overclock and everything and I am activated fine after installing cert/key so everything is ok right?
    Asus P5N-D
     
  4. Michel

    Michel MDL Expert

    Jul 29, 2009
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    If activated then everything is fine ;)
     
  5. bdearen

    bdearen MDL Junior Member

    Oct 3, 2009
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    nothing as far as different settings ect.. is changed when you mod a bios right? just the different strings to tell it it's a dell or w/e?
     
  6. twiz

    twiz MDL Senior Member

    Jul 30, 2009
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    #6 twiz, Oct 21, 2009
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2009
    Same thing happens to my PC...
    On my end, it's a stupid power-saving system, where if the monitor doesn't get a signal when it expects one, it will "disable" itself. The power button (makes me miss the oldskool rocker switches) doesn't respond, and the only way to 'fix' it I've found is to turn off the power strip or unplug it. Same thing happened to my dad a few years back.

    Computers as far bas as I have ever personally seen, contain a "CMOS" (complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor) battery that provides power so that your BIOS settings are retained even if power is completely drained from your computer.

    When doing a BIOS upgrade, it's recommended to reset the settings by removing the CMOS battery in case any of your previous settings are incopatible with the new BIOS. While this IS a possibility, I have not seen this happen in any real-world setting.