Pc is very slow and unusable after electricity failure.

Discussion in 'Windows 7' started by fibola, Jul 30, 2014.

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  1. fibola

    fibola MDL Junior Member

    Aug 20, 2011
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    hi,

    yesterday there was an electricity failure in my house, which include the first failure and than the electricity company tried to bring back power but it fail after 2 second .

    after power came back to regular , my pc started up but became very very slow .
    every click on the mouse take a long time to respond and sometimes causing the apps to freeze.

    system restore to earlier point fail and chkdsk isnt working - something about other program using the c: drive.

    i dont know if its a windows failure that formatting will fix or hardware failure (hdd, MotherBoard, CPU).

    any suggestion ?

    thanx
     
  2. MrMagic

    MrMagic MDL Guru

    Feb 13, 2012
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    reinstall windows
     
  3. Mr.X

    Mr.X MDL Guru

    Jul 14, 2013
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    #3 Mr.X, Jul 30, 2014
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2014
    Are you serious? After a power outage a hardware malfunction could arise, a full HDD diagnostic is needed, then a reinstall or re-format of Windows.
     
  4. Mr.X

    Mr.X MDL Guru

    Jul 14, 2013
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    #5 Mr.X, Jul 30, 2014
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2014
    @fibola
    I suggest to you, run a HDD test/s to ensure it's in good condition.
    I am quite sure it's a bad sectors case, maybe you'll need to replace it but first try to repair damaged sectors then do some testing with HD Sentinel.
     
  5. ypvs

    ypvs MDL Novice

    Dec 21, 2013
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    Have you checked your BIOS settings to make sure the Bus Speed and Multiplier are correct for your CPU? Might need to go through BIOS settings for anything that has reset back to default. Could be a faulty memory chip
     
  6. fibola

    fibola MDL Junior Member

    Aug 20, 2011
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    thank you for you replies.
    i will tried to set bios to default and see if it change anything.
    if not.... which tools is recommend for hdd testing : o&o is good ? or use HD Sentinel as mentioned?
     
  7. sunilk

    sunilk MDL Member

    May 15, 2014
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    HD Sentinel is a good one you can use it to check for errors on hdd
     
  8. fibola

    fibola MDL Junior Member

    Aug 20, 2011
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    #9 fibola, Aug 2, 2014
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2014
    (OP)
    1.jpg

    hi,
    i run hd seintinel and got a lot of errors- and 13% health for my hdd.
    i could figure how to fix it , so before going and buy a new hdd , i decided to isntall windows 8.1 .
    after doing that i still getting the result in the picture above (the picture represent situtation after installing windows 8.1)
    BUT all the slowing issue were gone and pc work as fast as before.

    question is , knowing that hdd is 13% health , should i buy a new one to avoid situation that in 2-3 month from now , i will have an hdd failure again, maybe one that data couldnt even be restore ?

    what do you think.
     
  9. Mr.X

    Mr.X MDL Guru

    Jul 14, 2013
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    Yes, you should buy a new one asap. Imminent hard failure that will render your disk unusable and data unrecoverable.
     
  10. f33nix

    f33nix MDL Member

    Apr 4, 2012
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    I ran the program on my 2nd hard drive (a seagate 3TB drive) and it says exactly the same 13% bad health :g:
    It says I have estimated 27 days left :biggrin: but I for one will not be replacing it in a hurry!

    If you look to the right of the red notification area you can see a ? press that and take the time to read all the text and maybe you are worrying over simple re-allocated sectors. You should make real surface scans of the drive to determine if the disk is bad or if you have just some re-allocated sectors.

    If the drive is a boot drive/system disk then you should have a backup in place if you are sensible and you should always have a minimum of 2 copies of your important files so if a drive dies you do not loose important files... prepare now for disaster but I doubt your drive is goosed given the power on hours/startup count I see.
     
  11. Carlos Detweiller

    Carlos Detweiller MDL Spinning Tortoise

    Dec 21, 2012
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    Bull. Nothing can repair physically bad sectors. It just forces reallocation of spare sectors.
     
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  12. rEApEAt

    rEApEAt MDL Senior Member

    Jan 5, 2011
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    Just a piece of advice for the future: buy a strong surge protector (or a solution that includes good surge protection) to ensure that it will not happen again.
     
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  13. Myrrh

    Myrrh MDL Expert

    Nov 26, 2008
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    I prefer the surge protectors with batteries inside. Otherwise known as UPS.
     
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  14. rEApEAt

    rEApEAt MDL Senior Member

    Jan 5, 2011
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    That's what I meant when I said "a solution that includes good surge protection". I use both: wall outlet > surge protector (2.000 joules) > UPS > computer.

    The cheapest UPS being junk (at least in my country), I always prefer to advise for a good surge protector in the first place. It's the bare minimum to protect hardware and data and has no collateral downsides. But a good and somewhat expensive UPS is the best solution. No doubt about that.
     
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  15. R29k

    R29k MDL GLaDOS

    Feb 13, 2011
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    So you have the surge plugged into the wall outlet and the ups plugged into the surge ? :whistling:
     
  16. rEApEAt

    rEApEAt MDL Senior Member

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  17. westom

    westom MDL Novice

    Aug 9, 2014
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    A surge protector that failed did not provide any protection. Of course anyone can see that in its numbers. For example, destructive surges can be hundreds of thousands of joules. How many joules did a protector claim to absorb? Hundreds? A thousand? Near zero protection. But just enough above zero that advertising can claim 100% protection.

    Being so tiny, these protectors must have a thermal fuse that disconnects tiny protectors parts as fast as possible. And leaves a surge connected to attached appliances. All appliances already have robust protection. A surge too tiny to damage the appliance easily damages that protector. That thermal fuse blows to avert a house fire.

    Sometimes that fuse does not blow fast enough. Fire results. As APC recently admitted with some APC protectors so dangerous as to be eliminated immediately. So where is this protection? Where are manufacturer spec numbers that claim this protection?

    A UPS is not a surge protector. Read its numeric specifications. Even tinier protection. But again, just enough above zero so that many consumers will recommend it as a surge protector.

    That completely different device, also called a protector, is the only solution used in any facility that cannot have damage. Is even necessary so that plug-in protectors do not cause a fire. But again, protectors do not do protection. Effective protectors only connect a surge to what will harmlessly absorb that energy (ie hundreds of thousands of joules). Effective protectors connect low impedance (ie 'less than 10 feet') to earth. The earthing electrode absorbs all that energy only when earthing one 'whole house' protector.

    If protector does not connect low impedance to protection (earth ground), then protection all but does not exist. Again, protection means you can always say where that energy (hundreds of thousands of joules) harmlessly dissipates.

    No adjacent UPS is effective protection. But the myth is widely believed due to hearsay and by even ignoring manufacturer specification numbers.

    'Whole house' protectors are provided by many means. For example, many utilities even rent them; installed behind their meter. Homeowners can even kludge them. But we know that best protection at an appliance is already inside the appliance. Your concern is a rare transient, maybe once every seven years, that can blow through existing protection. Effective protectors are adjacent to earth ground. Protection increases with each additional meter of separation between protector and appliance.

    How many times have you replaced a surge damaged furnace, GFCI (RCD), clocks, dimmer switches, fire protection panel or smoke detectors, dishwasher, TVs, etc? What protects them? Most are less robust than a computer. Why are you not replacing the air conditioner or CFL bulbs monthly? What urban myth calls a surge is even made irrelevant by what is already inside dimmer switches. Only protection from that rare and truly destructive surge always has a low impedance (ie wire with no sharp bends) connection to single point earth ground (all four words are significant). So that even plug-in protectors will not cause a house fire.
     
  18. R29k

    R29k MDL GLaDOS

    Feb 13, 2011
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    As someone who worked on cell towers, I can tell you that absolutely nothing will save your equipment if lightning strikes, you have to try to divert whatever you can to ground. Likewise in your house, ensure you are grounded at the main and use a UPS for you computer mainly to save data if power fails. You can add a surge protector behind the ups if you need the outlets. Also 2000 joules is not a lot there are 4000-6000 joule devices on Amazon.