Questions regarding Laptop Screen Resolutions

Discussion in 'Windows 10' started by MMIKEE, Jul 30, 2020.

  1. MMIKEE

    MMIKEE MDL Senior Member

    Oct 6, 2012
    331
    297
    10
    Questions regarding Laptop Screen Resolutions

    Note: Dell Drivers & BIOS is up to date and Windows 10 LTSC has the latest CU and updates…



    This may or may not be DOABLE, but if possible, please provide feedback…



    My Dell XPS 15 9500 (2020) uses a default Screen Res of 3840 x 2400 which is fine most of the time…

    However, that Hi-Res mode is not useful for the following situations

    1. Some software is difficult to see and use (tiny Text / Images / Icons etc)…

    2. When booting up with a USB Flash Drive to use AOME! Partition Manager or Backerupper it is almost impossible to see the tiny Text / Images / Icons on the screen / windows…

    3. Windows Photo Viewer often displays tiny images that would otherwise look normal on lower-res screen modes…

    I can easily change the default Screen Res to 1920 x 1200 etc, but then all windows must be relocated and resized to be useful every time Screen Res is changed back and forth…

    I can boot using the Windows 10 Low Res (VGA) mode but this does not help with #2 above and is not useful for most other purposes…

    I would like to be able to force BIOS / UEFI to use a lower-res display mode when using #2… I checked all BIOS / UEFI settings and found no setting to do so… Is there software, patch, or a script that can do this reliably?

    I also want a method to be able to switch Screen Resolutions after bootup that will REMEMBER the changes made for each preferred screen mode to avoid the issue of having to reset window locations and size each time a Screen Resolution change is performed…

    Google search has NOT been helpful in this regard so far…
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  2. MS_User

    MS_User MDL Guru

    Nov 30, 2014
    3,757
    815
    120
    have u gone into your display settings and change your resolution settings in their?
     
  3. pf100

    pf100 MDL Expert

    Oct 22, 2010
    1,845
    2,784
    60
    #2 would require you to replace your display with a lower resolution one.
     
  4. TrustMe

    TrustMe MDL Member

    May 2, 2013
    187
    65
    10
    I am never buying a high resolution screen again. It is nothing but a headache. So many programs the words can not be read because they are so tiny. Aomei programs are the worst. When I do a clean install I have to use a magnifying glass. Never again!
     
  5. MMIKEE

    MMIKEE MDL Senior Member

    Oct 6, 2012
    331
    297
    10
    I tried doing that using 1920 x 1200 then rebooting to the USB Flash Drive... It had no effect and AOME! Partition Manager or Backerupper s almost impossible to see the tiny Text / Images / Icons on the screen / windows…
    It seems like BIOS / UEFI uses a default Screen Res of 3840 x 2400 and only once Windows is running that the chosen resolution is used until changed by the user...
    IIRC, AOMEI reported in the initial boot screen message that IT could NOT change the Screen Resolution...
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  6. MMIKEE

    MMIKEE MDL Senior Member

    Oct 6, 2012
    331
    297
    10
    Yes, and it had no effect and AOME! Partition Manager or Backerupper are almost impossible to see the tiny Text / Images / Icons on the screen / windows…
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  7. MMIKEE

    MMIKEE MDL Senior Member

    Oct 6, 2012
    331
    297
    10
    You'd think that Laptop manufacturers and Software Companies that provide BOOT UP Utilities to REPAIR / REINSTALL an OS would provide methods to circumvent these ISSUES... Evidently they can't, won't or are ignoring this dilemma... :mad:
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  8. Carlos Detweiller

    Carlos Detweiller MDL Spinning Tortoise

    Dec 21, 2012
    3,821
    3,597
    120
    Laptop displays tend to not support screen interpolation well (interpolation is the upscaling of lower resolutions to full screen sizes, enlarging everything). Instead, they sometimes use the native screen res and show the low-res application in a tiny rectangle in the center.

    Also, the problem with modern class3 and beyond UEFI implementations is, that they lack the INT10 graphics routines of the legacy BIOS. DOS programs utilizing these routines can not switch resolutions or do some other graphic-related things.

    There is really no other way than connecting an external monitor and switch to using that for boot. Any half-decent dedicated monitor will internally upscale low resolutions.
     
  9. pf100

    pf100 MDL Expert

    Oct 22, 2010
    1,845
    2,784
    60
    I've had success actually unplugging the display from the laptop's motherboard and using an external display. I'm not saying you should do that, and I'm no expert on new hi-rez laptop displays as concerns uefi res overrides, but I don't see why it would upscale the resolution in that case.
     
  10. Carlos Detweiller

    Carlos Detweiller MDL Spinning Tortoise

    Dec 21, 2012
    3,821
    3,597
    120
    Please note that my post is especially about the boot to DOS programs. DOS software had to access the hardware directly, and prolly provide the drivers required. In the most basic case, the routines inside the BIOS were enough, accessible through INT10h. Higher resolutions had to use special drivers. The most popular were the Universal VESA BIOS extensions (UNIVBE.EXE).
    Newest UEFI have removed the INT10h routines and replaced them with GOP/UGA. DOS programs probably cannot use that, or have to be updated.

    However, displays that don't upscale lower resolutions are the plague. Even at the native resolution, text etc. is too tiny for many people. I'm using 100%, but many use 125%, 150% or even higher scales.

    Here's an illustration attached. The white is UHD 3840 x 2160 resolution, and the grey rectangle is the pretty standard DOS resolution 640 x 480. That's quite a difference, and shows how tiny would a DOS program be on a UHD display, if it did not scale.

    640x480_in_3840x2160.jpg
     
  11. monkeybagel

    monkeybagel MDL Novice

    Jan 22, 2010
    2
    0
    0
    For Remote Desktop into legacy OSs, use the Microsoft Remote Desktop Manager that was released many years ago. It still works great and scales the remote desktop (Windows Server 2003, for example) to a very usable size. It is still available from Microsoft's Download Center.
     
  12. MMIKEE

    MMIKEE MDL Senior Member

    Oct 6, 2012
    331
    297
    10
    Fortunately, the Dell XPS 15 9500 (2020) Upscales the default Screen Res of 3840 x 2400 to 250%, and when I use 1920 x 1200 it Upscales to 125% which both are fine for the desktop and most programs I use... When in BIOS / UEFI the display is easy to read and use and I have no idea what Screen Res that might be...

    IF I had known that UHD displays are prone to the issues mentioned in this thread, I would have instead got the Lower Res 1920 x 1200 model which is much less $$$... I read many reviews of this laptop prior to purchase... There were many PRO's and very few CON's, and these issues were never mentioned...
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  13. ohenry

    ohenry MDL Junior Member

    Aug 10, 2009
    59
    26
    0
    I have a 27 inch monitor, running 2560 x 1440, at 125%. This is the primary monitor on my desktop, the secondary being a 24 inch 1920x1080. I have no complaints about this monitor. I did try, temporarily, a 27 inch which runs at 3840 x 2160, and had a number of problems. My original intent was to use it (the 3840 x 2160) on my company notebook in my home office, as I am (like so many others) working from home these days. The company notebook is a Lenovo T470, with Intel 620 graphics. The docking station for the T470 has a Display Port connector, which is required to get 3840x2160 at 60 hz. The best HDMI would do is 3840x2160 at 30 hz. Unless you have HDMI 2.0, which I did not. I got everything working, looked really good, but the notebook became unstable. These Lenovo notebooks are the most stable PC's that I have ever dealt with, partly because the company keeps them locked down, no junk software.

    But apparently that high resolution put too much of a strain on the Intel graphics, and the notebook would lock up under heavy use. So I gave up on that, and moved the new monitor over to my personal desktop, replacing the 27 inch, 2560 x 1440 monitor. My motherboard / cpu has Intel 630 graphics built in, good enough, but it does not have a Display Port connector nor HDMI 2.0. Next step, Nvidia GT710 graphics card, which has HDMI 2.0 which will support 3840x2160, if you get the right cable. After trying about 4 cables, I finally got the monitor running at 60 hz. But trying to find the right scale factor was difficult, if not impossible. What was right, looked good for one set of circumstances, was completely wrong under a different set of circumstances.

    So the 3840 x 2160 monitor is sitting over in the corner, unused at present. I need to get motivated and run an ad on Craigslist and sell that sucker.
     
  14. kaljukass

    kaljukass MDL Guru

    Nov 26, 2012
    2,068
    748
    90
    I have a feeling I don't understand what you're talking here.
    If You know, that the display resolution is a feature or characteristic of display devices that indicates how many pixels the device is capable of displaying. The higher the screen resolution, the more detailed and sharp the displayed image when viewed from the correct distance.
    And because it's a physical feature of the display device, you can't change it in any way.
    If the resolution of currently used display does not suit you, you can only use another monitors with a lower or higher resolution. That's the thing, what you can do, but cannot change any display resolutoin, it is as it is, it is a display characteristic, that the display has due to its construction.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  15. Carlos Detweiller

    Carlos Detweiller MDL Spinning Tortoise

    Dec 21, 2012
    3,821
    3,597
    120
    What you are referring to is the native resolution; that one is indeed fixed for non-CRT and everything looks best in this resolution. But, of course you you can change the OS resolution. Different monitors/displays will act differently, most will upscale or stretch the lower-res image. Lower-than-native resolution will never look as good as the native one, of course.