Some questions about different hardwares in a Computer.

Discussion in 'PC Hardware' started by Happpy, Dec 11, 2010.

  1. Happpy

    Happpy MDL Senior Member

    Jan 23, 2010
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    1- What's the difference among Dual Core, Core2Duo, Core2Quad, Core2Extreme, Corei3, Corei5 and Core i7 processors?

    2- If processor has cache memory then why we need of RAM and Virtual Memory? What benefit can we take from increasing cache memory?

    3- Where a GPU plug in a computer? Can CPU and GPU both together plug into one PC?

    4- What's is an Intel VGA Card, external 3D graphic card and a GPU? When we have VGA fix in PC then why we need an external card plus GPU?

    I've searched a lot of these questions on Google but I couldn't find exact answer or I'm not satisfy yet. So I request to a Hardware Master to answer me please.

    Regards,
     
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  2. alextheg

    alextheg Super Moderator
    Staff Member

    Jan 7, 2009
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    1. Dual core = 2 processor core's. Core 2 Duo is simply one version of these processor's. Core 2 Quad = 4 processor core's. Twice the performance of a dual core processor. Intel i3, i5 and i7 processors are the new generation high end processor's. These cpu's come in in dual , quad and hex core (6 core's). More core's equals more performance. Having a larger CPU cache increases data transfer and processing performance.

    2. The simplest way to imagine a cpu's cache is like giving it its own personal peice of memory that allows for much quicker processing of data. We still need RAM for all the other going's on in the pc because you would never be able to get enough memory into a tiny cpu to do all the work that RAM performs.

    3. Yes you can plug a cpu and gpu in one machine. A computer cannot operate without a cpu. A Graphics Processing Unit can be built into the motherboard, this is called integrated graphics. Or a GPU can be added into the machine by plugging a graphics card into one of the pci slots. Obviously a perfonce increase is gained by adding a graphics card.

    4. If we have integrated VGA such as Intel we do not need an external GPU but as stated in 3, performance is enhanced by adding a graphics card. When a graphics card is added the integrated VGA is no longer used by the machine.

    I hope this helps answer your questions. :)
     
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  3. asudo

    asudo MDL Novice

    Dec 13, 2010
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    #3 asudo, Dec 13, 2010
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2010
    Interesting topic and really nice information about this. Great detailing informatino, I appreciate form this post. Very useful and knowledgeable post. So many people doesn't know about this techonology. You increase the our knowledge. Thanks for sharing this nice information and post.
     
  4. Happpy

    Happpy MDL Senior Member

    Jan 23, 2010
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    Some more and complicated questions for you alextheg: I request you to answer these please too.

    1- How many maxiumum cores Intel i3, i5 and i7 processors have? I've listened that some i3 processors have 2 cors or 3 and some i5 have 4 or 5 cores and i7 has 5, 6 or 7 cores. So is it right? What do you think about that?

    3- So where we can plug a GPU in a CPU (as we can plug a 3D card in an AGP Slot or PCI Slot)? If we plug it (GPU) with an external 3D card then would 3D card be OFF or still remain ON and will add its memory to GPU's memory? I mean 3D card and GPU both's memory will be added or stil GPU alone will work after plugging it with external 3D graphic card? Also can we plug GPU into a PC without external graphic card? Also Would VGA get OFF after GPU's plugging alone into PC?

    Regards,
     
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  5. andy_s

    andy_s MDL Novice

    Nov 21, 2010
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    In regard to this question: A GPU is commonly called a graphics card or adaptor. As mentioned, it can be one that's integrated into the motherboard (and as such is referred to as a on-board graphics) along with the various other chips (including CPU). These are usually a lower cost option to keep pricing down or build size small (as in media players etc.).

    An external graphics card (GPU) can be installed into various slots dependant on the motherboards specification - a PCI or AGP GPU 2 different types of slots but are becoming old in terms of current technology. You can't 'mix and match slot types so getting the correct card (GPU) for the correct slot is important.

    More modern graphics cards are based around the PCI-E technology, again, this is different from AGP or PCI. It gives more flexibility and power/speed for applications that need them (Such as current gaming, video editing etc.)

    A PC has what's called a BIOS chip built into it. This chip is like a translator and takes software commands from your operating system (Via it's device driver) and converts them into a language your hardware can understand and hence, act upon correctly.

    Within the BIOS will usually be options to either use the on-board GPU, or switch to an external one (as in installing a card).

    An on-board GPU will usually takes it's memory requirements from the PC's installed ram so this amount will be limited to the Motherboards BIOS limitation on how much it can use. IF you install an external card, this will have it's own memory chips on it. The amount of memory the internal (built-in) GPU used will not be added to this, but will be released back into the main memory for general computer use.

    Modern systems using the newer PCI-e standard can sometimes have two graphics cards installed, running in parallel to further increase the GPU power. There is also certain computer software which can utilise these cards GPU's into assisting the PC's main CPU into making computational calculations (Such as NVidia's CUDA protocol which I use)

    That's my understanding of that question anyway (Correct me someone if I'm wrong).

    Hope it helps
     
  6. Happpy

    Happpy MDL Senior Member

    Jan 23, 2010
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    Hello, Andy!

    Thanks for your descriptive reply.

    But I still only have one unclear thing.

    Do you mean an external 3D card (of AGP or PCI) is the alternative or second name of GPU? OR these are two different things? I couldn't understand difference between an external 3D Card and GPU.

    Can we say NVIDIA GeForce 9400 GT a GPU? Can we say ASUS ATI Radeon 3450 a GPU? Can we say GeForce 6200 a GPU? and so on...
     
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  7. Happpy

    Happpy MDL Senior Member

    Jan 23, 2010
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    Please pay attention to my question. This is the last one now.
     
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  8. cynarch

    cynarch MDL Senior Member

    Aug 28, 2010
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    Yes you can.. although they are of different brands and types, they are all VGAs

    GraphicProcessingUnit = VideoGraphicAdaptor = video card = graphic card

    They may either be "onboard" that means integrated (onboard) to the motherboard by manufacturer or bought as separate unit (non onboard).

    An onboard motherboards can also use an extra (additional) GPUs. Its internal vga can either be turned off to set the extra GPU to work alone or turned on to enhance the extra GPU (this configuration is called as "crossfire" on ATI Radeon VGA and "SLI" on NVDIA VGA, this configuration depends on model)

    An integrated motherboard uses RAM for its operation thus we need to install more RAM to the motherboard whereas a non integrated motherboard doesn't as its GPU has it own.

    A motherboard without internal VGA can also use more than one GPU, again depends on model.
     
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