[Tutorial] My experience with cleaning matte finished monitors.

Discussion in 'PC Hardware' started by QuantumBug, Jan 7, 2016.

  1. QuantumBug

    QuantumBug MDL Developer

    Mar 7, 2012
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    #1 QuantumBug, Jan 7, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2016
    Just a little help seems its taken me time to get this down; yet all along it was so simple.

    For ages I've been using all of these fancy sprays, everyone asks me to clean their monitors knowing I'm a hardware engineer, but they never work properly. Not to mention the ample amounts of cloths wasted... so here we go.

    1. Get yourself a pack of cheap micro-fiber cloths (two needed)
    2. Unplug your monitor always
    3. Soak one micro-fiber cloth with warm water (not hot) and squeeze it out to make sure it does NOT drip! If it leaks into your monitor it's your fault, not mine :D
    4. Rub gently in a circular motion and make sure to get into those annoying corners.
    5. Once you're happy with the cleaning, take a dry micro-fiber cloth and rub in a circular motion and keep going until the water has dissipated.

    If there are any stubborn greasy patches left rub them in a circular motion again and dry again, they should disappear. Let me know how you get on and please don't electrocute yourself, I did say don't let the cloth drip.

    To answer some questions:

    1. Pure Isopropyl alcohol can wear away finishes and leave permanent white smudges, therefor I don't even use it on glass
    2. Glass cleaners like windex do not work and can damage your screen, especially matte front monitors, this is due to containing harsh chemicals
    3. Disposable towels can scratch your screen, so I agree with Antilope (thanks); do not use tissue or disposable kitchen towels. If your micro-fiber cloth is clean it's the best thing to use
    4. The best and only way for me has been warm water, if you don't have warm water use cold or boil the kettle and wait for it to cool.
    5. The water I use has been through a reverse osmosis system and cleansed from any sediments, etc. But unless your tap water dispenses harsh lumps I'm pretty sure it's fine
     
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  2. bpwnes

    bpwnes MDL Member

    Aug 11, 2015
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    I usually buff screens with isopropyl alcohol and microfiber cloths until it is spotless. I'll have to try using warm water sometime... too bad the sink at work doesn't have hot water. I'd also like to point out that it would be a little safer to use distilled water than tap water.
     
  3. cdavisdeco

    cdavisdeco MDL Senior Member

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    How about a tissue serviette instead of micro fiber cloth?
     
  4. Antilope

    Antilope MDL Member

    Sep 15, 2015
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    Because they are made from wood pulp, tissues can be abrasive and leave fine scratches on a plastic screen. I would go with the microfiber cloth.
     
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  5. Antilope

    Antilope MDL Member

    Sep 15, 2015
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    I would worry that alcohol may remove or damage any special coatings that might be on a screen. Or maybe make the plastic screen hazy.

    If you have a microwave at work, that's a source of hot water.
     
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  6. Joe C

    Joe C MDL Guru

    Jan 12, 2012
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    I've been using a mix of 50% isopropyl alcohol and 50% distilled water for several years with no issues, and makes cleaning the greasy spots much easier. It's the same as that fancy stuff you can buy
     
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  7. pisthai

    pisthai Imperfect Human

    Jul 29, 2009
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    Just got a Acer LCD Monitor from a customer for cleaning!

    There's a serious problem with that, that customer was spray a mix of Water and Sodium Silicate to some frabric near to the Monitor and there a lot dot's from that spray now on the screen. Very hard to remove, impossible the normal way. Lotion like Ethanol, Menthyl Alcohol etc., etc. simply didn't works!

    So question: Has anybody an idea about how to remove those dots?

    Thanks for any information.
     
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  8. matt167

    matt167 MDL Junior Member

    Oct 8, 2013
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    Probably SOL. Water glass ( sodium silicate ) is generally considered permanent when dry. It's used as a concrete sealer, and a head gasket fix in the automotive band-aid world, among other things.
     
  9. pisthai

    pisthai Imperfect Human

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    It's also used for to "impregnate" (make waterprotect) textiles/fabrics!

    And YES, it's also called Waterglass!

    Any idea how to remove that dot's from the screen?

    Thanks.
     
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  10. Joe C

    Joe C MDL Guru

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  11. QuantumBug

    QuantumBug MDL Developer

    Mar 7, 2012
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    #11 QuantumBug, Jan 8, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2016
    (OP)
    To answer some questions:

    1. Pure Isopropyl alcohol can wear away finishes and leave permanent white smudges, therefor I don't even use it on glass
    2. Glass cleaners like windex do not work and can damage your screen, especially matte front monitors, this is due to containing harsh chemicals
    3. Disposable towels can scratch your screen, so I agree with Antilope (thanks); do not use tissue or disposable kitchen towels. If your micro-fiber cloth is clean it's the best thing to use
    4. The best and only way for me personally has been warm water, if you don't have warm water use cold or boil the kettle and wait for it to cool.
    5. The water I use has been through a reverse osmosis system and cleansed from any sediments, etc. But unless your tap water dispenses harsh lumps I'm pretty sure it's fine

    I also agree with Joe C's original comment, watered down Isopropyl alcohol on really greasy screens is better than using pure.

    @pisthai You won't get those marks off the screen, sorry. Unless you create a new front panel. But seriously - You know Sodium Sicilate is water soluble? Have you tried using very warm water?
     
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  12. Joe C

    Joe C MDL Guru

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    #12 Joe C, Jan 8, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2016
    No doubt about it.
    I nearly had a heart attack when the Mrs. told me she cleaned our new 55" tv screen with windex. Good thing she has a sense of humor and got me on that one
     
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  13. bpwnes

    bpwnes MDL Member

    Aug 11, 2015
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    I should clarify my earlier post a lil... I use screen cleaning kits until they run out, then refill the squirt bottles. I use 70% isopropyl alcohol mixed with some distilled water. I don't really measure it, just use a little more alcohol than water (60/40 maybe?). Spritz the screen and buff with a microfiber cloth using small circles until it's clean and spotless.

    @Antilope - Good call on the microwave, I don't know why I didn't think of that before.

    Just never substitute acetone for isopropyl alcohol. It eats plastic and you will seriously mess up the surface. I did that to the front of an old case of mine once. Now it's smooth instead of matte lol.
     
  14. QuantumBug

    QuantumBug MDL Developer

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    #14 QuantumBug, Jan 8, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2016
    (OP)
    Thanks for clarifying, I find Isopropyl alcohol is the best on glass as it helps with evaporation and it is great at eating cutting stubborn grease, but with matte I found it really does eat panel finishes too. One customer had been cleaning his 120Hz gaming monitor with a 50/50 mix of water/iso and it had left white haze over the entire screen (except the corners :D)

    I would personally use iso/water 20/80 at the most on matte and 30/70 on glass.

    The thing is you never know what is going to happen depending on what you use. Some people have no issues ever using 100% iso and some people trash their screen with a 50/50 mix after cleaning it a few times.

    Usually I steer clear of all chemicals unless they're definitely needed. Like using an ultrasonic cleaner after I've finished a mac component level repair or attempt at removing water corrosion.
     
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  15. pisthai

    pisthai Imperfect Human

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    LCD Monitor Screens are not from Glass! They're made from some kind of Poly..... (Plastic etc.)!

    That monitor in question is a Acer AL2216W 22" Monitor and the first level of that screen is a kind Anti-Glare Film, attached by the Manufacturer.

    In meantime I've get that screen near back to normal already. I used Screen 99 from Kontakt Chemie and it does the job quite well. Warm Water, heated to 50°C, wasn't working, as other, like Alcohol etc. try's also!

    I'm a long time user of some products from Kontakt Chemie and have very good experiences with those, special Kontakt 61 and some others. Difficult to get in Bangkok, just one Dealer in Bangkok's China Town has it, but all times and all their products.

    I use Kontakt 61 many times for to clean the USB Contact's because that's the only solution I ever found really working!

    So, I could say: The problem with that Monitor is solved now. Thanks for all answers.
     
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  16. QuantumBug

    QuantumBug MDL Developer

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    Pisthai I'm confused, you say there are no glass front monitors?

    Apple Mac have glass fronts, computers with touch screens are glass due to containing digitisers and I have an old 27" glass front monitor here.

    We're not literally speaking about LCD panels, we're talking about all monitors including any finish they may have, wether it be glass or plastic.
     
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  17. Michaela Joy

    Michaela Joy MDL Crazy Lady

    Jul 26, 2012
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    The important thing to do here is to follow the manufacturers instructions. As has been mentioned, some displays are sensitive to certain solvents. Some can actually be damaged by alcohols.

    Glass is usually pretty robust, but some glass displays are coated (Much like eyewear). Certain solvents can strip away that coating.

    Be careful using dishwashing detergent. Some detergents have solvents and disinfectants that can cause problems (milkiness, dull finishes, etc.)

    In the USA, we have a dishwashing soap called "Ivory Liquid". Even this has ethyl alcohol, which can damage a display finish.
     
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  18. QuantumBug

    QuantumBug MDL Developer

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    Agreed, this is why I only use water now. Unless something cannot be removed, therefore I no choice to attempt removal with something stronger.
     
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  19. pisthai

    pisthai Imperfect Human

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  20. QuantumBug

    QuantumBug MDL Developer

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    pisthai I think you're over exaggerating a bit, calm down, keep it on topic. You completely missed what I was saying and went into ego mode, I simply said there are monitors with glass fronts, YOU just misunderstood me, let's leave it at that :D
     
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