UEFI firmware associated with Windows 8

Discussion in 'Windows 8' started by NikosGr, Jan 3, 2013.

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  1. NikosGr

    NikosGr MDL Member

    Sep 3, 2012
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    I bought a Lenovo
    It has an UEFI firmware associated with Windows 8 OS protecting it by secure Boot feature.
    When i boot in recovery mode i could see an option saying about UEFI software/hardware.

    I used GParted and deleted ALL its partitions.
    I installed 8 again with my partitonign.
    No UEFI present there and no option on the recovery menu as before.
    How can i re-associate UEFI firmware with Windows 8 OS as it was when i bough it?


    What's the reason of UEFI existance anyway? In what ways can it be usefull?
     
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  2. Stannieman

    Stannieman MDL Guru

    Sep 4, 2009
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    You don't have to associate anything. When secureboot is on it will only load signed bootloaders. So if you install win8 in uefi mode and it boots then it's good.

    And the reason for UEFI's existance? It replaces the old crappy bios.
     
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  3. redroad

    redroad MDL Guru

    Dec 2, 2011
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    I still like the old crappy bios in some applications :biggrin:
     
  4. NikosGr

    NikosGr MDL Member

    Sep 3, 2012
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    a) Signed Boot Loader = An OS installation in UEFI Mode so a system can boot safely only from that and no other OS or ISO Image?


    b) I tried to use GParted via a bootable USB drive and UEFI didn't allow that.
    Can i tell somehow UEFI to let that usb drive boot without disablign the SecureBoot feature? As in a a signed Boot Application?


    Is UEFI something like a whitelist of OSes and Applications tat are allowed by the UEFI firmware to load on a specific machine?
    Much like a Firmware Firewall to allow/dis-allow Boot stuff?

    This is what its been designed for?
     
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  5. bk109

    bk109 MDL Senior Member

    Aug 12, 2012
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    It didn't happen in his 5-page long thread about his Acer's SATA driver non-issue (I specifically asked a friend of mine to install Win8 on it to see if we'll see any issues whatsoever. Kinda unsurprisingly,it installed without a hitch and hell,it's still running it now,because it's faster than 7 on the same hardware.. ;) )

    As for the question at hand - just download the latest bloody Ubuntu distribution (12.10) as it's Secure-boot enabled and use gparted from it. That's the easiest solution,which you'd have discovered if you took the time to use a fancy new service called 'Google' XD
     
  6. Shenj

    Shenj MDL Expert

    Aug 12, 2010
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    Whats the point in using gparted.. you can do everything on the Windows setup command line.
     
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  7. bk109

    bk109 MDL Senior Member

    Aug 12, 2012
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    #7 bk109, Jan 4, 2013
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 4, 2013
    Yes,diskpart..Well,I thought what the OP was asking for (among other things)... In all honesty, I just think that he ought to bite the bullet and just bring his machine in a repairshop so he learns why someone shouldn't tinker around with technology he's not really familiar with ;)
     
  8. NikosGr

    NikosGr MDL Member

    Sep 3, 2012
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    What i have asked in my last post isn't answered in the links you provided me.
     
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  9. hbhb

    hbhb MDL Expert

    Dec 15, 2010
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    Dude Niko, you are pushing the envelope and showing more signs of mental lapses, the following is copied from Vymrdal links, as sugested read and get off the mentality of give me but dont show me,

    system firmware.
    UEFI Advantages
    In addition to better interoperability, UEFI firmware provides the following advantages.
    Compatibility with earlier BIOS
    Most current UEFI implementations include a Compatibility Support Module (CSM) that emulates earlier BIOS. So, systems with UEFI firmware can boot operating systems that are UEFI aware and older operating systems that support only BIOS. This feature provides flexibility and compatibility for end users.
    Support for large disks
    BIOS systems support disks that use the master boot record (MBR) partitioning scheme. This scheme is limited to a maximum disk size of roughly 2.2 terabytes and a maximum of 4 primary partitions.
    UEFI supports a more flexible partitioning scheme called GUID Partition Table (GPT). GPT disks use 64-bit values to describe partitions. This scheme allows a maximum disk size of roughly 16.8 million terabytes and 128 primary partitions.
    CPU-independent architecture
    Although BIOS can run 32-bit and 64-bit operating systems, during early stages of boot, it relies on a 16-bit interface called "real mode". This interface is based on the original Intel x86 processor architecture. All firmware device drivers (such as RAID controllers) on BIOS systems must also be 16-bit. This requirement limits the addressable memory to 64 kilobytes (KB) in the early stages of boot and consequently constrains performance.
    UEFI isn't specific to any processor architecture. It can support modern 32-bit and 64-bit firmware device drivers. The 64-bit capability enables the system to address more than 17.2 billion gigabytes (GB) of memory from the earliest stages of boot.
    CPU-independent drivers
    On BIOS systems, Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) add-on cards must include a large ROM that contains a separate driver for all supported CPU architectures. Or the card vendor must provide a unique stock-keeping unit (SKU) for each processor architecture.
    All UEFI implementations that conform to the UEFI specification include an EFI Byte Code (EBC) interpreter. EBC images are drivers that are compatible across all processor architectures. This enables device-driver and application developers to create a single EBC image that can run on any system. Because EBC images are highly compact and universally applicable, firmware drivers (also known as option ROMs) in a PCI card can be much smaller than they are on BIOS systems, and they can serve multiple markets. This helps reduce cost and confusion and makes it much easier for system vendors to update or replace drivers as necessary.
    Flexible pre-OS environment
    UEFI drivers and applications run in the boot environment with very few constraints. For example, UEFI can provide a full network protocol stack in addition to high-resolution graphics and access to all devices, even if no functional operating system is available.
    Because UEFI supports a flexible pre-OS programming environment, UEFI applications can perform a wide variety of tasks for any type of PC hardware. For example, UEFI applications can perform diagnostics and firmware upgrades, repair the operating system and notify technicians, or contact a remote server for authentication.
    Modular design
    BIOS implementations must be carefully customized for a specific set of hardware. The tightly interwoven components often mean that even small changes can have wide-ranging effects. The introduction of new hardware and protocols typically requires significant portions of BIOS firmware to be rewritten. This is expensive and time-consuming.
    UEFI defines modular components and generic interfaces that intentionally abstract the details of the hardware/software interface. This approach enables firmware vendors to introduce new hardware and protocols, fix bugs, or alter the behavior of specific components with minimal effects on the rest of the system.
     
  10. BTOR

    BTOR MDL Addicted

    Nov 18, 2009
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    UEFI : Unified Extensible Firmware Interface is meant as a replacement for the BIOS,If you are using USB stick should be formatted FAT32. you may also use DVD

    1.Set first /default boot device to UEFI / windows boot manager
    2.UEFI is possible only in GPT disk (if you have formated as MBR DISK convert it to GPT DISK)
    3.Boot from windows setup DVD or USB and install windows
    4.Now you will have a UEFI bootable windows
    5.Since you have deleted the recovery partition provided by lenevo you won't have the recovery option ,unless you made a recovery disk . If by chance you have one try installing windows from that disk in step 3.
     
  11. Please-8

    Please-8 MDL Junior Member

    Sep 12, 2012
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    As far as I know all "Windows 8" certificated OEM PCs must fulfil the following requirements:
    • Must boot from UEFI
    • Must boot from GPT disk
    • Must boot with secure boot
    • Must have the ability to disable secure boot (except "Windows RT")
    I think the last requirement is very important: Because otherwise you can't boot from any DVD; e.g to boot from a recovery DVD (Acronis, etc.).

    So it also should be able to disable secure boot in UEFI and boot Linux "Gparted" from CD.
     
  12. NikosGr

    NikosGr MDL Member

    Sep 3, 2012
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  13. NikosGr

    NikosGr MDL Member

    Sep 3, 2012
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    Very true my friend that why in my 2nd post i have asked the following questions so to understand the USE of UEFI and i got mocked.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------
    a) Signed Boot Loader = An OS installation in UEFI Mode so a system can boot safely only from that and no other OS or ISO Image?


    b) I tried to use GParted via a bootable USB drive and UEFI didn't allow that.
    Can i tell somehow UEFI to let that usb drive boot without disablign the SecureBoot feature? As in a a signed Boot Application?


    Is UEFI something like a whitelist of OSes and Applications tat are allowed by the UEFI firmware to load on a specific machine?
    Much like a Firmware Firewall to allow/dis-allow Boot stuff?

    This is what its been designed for?
     
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  14. NikosGr

    NikosGr MDL Member

    Sep 3, 2012
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    Actually i didn't see your posted links yesterday because i was very tired asking all day and couldnt read hem too.
    Today i found this link myself.
    Its not moronic i just didn't read the links of your posts.

    And yet, i dont know if thery answer my questions.
    The one i posted that you also posted doenst answer to what i have aksed, maybe the other ones too(dont know for usre though)

    I'll repost

    a) Signed Boot Loader = An OS installation in UEFI Mode so a system can boot safely only from that and no other OS or ISO Image?


    b) I tried to use GParted via a bootable USB drive and UEFI didn't allow that.
    Can i tell somehow UEFI to let that usb drive boot without disablign the SecureBoot feature? As in a a signed Boot Application?


    Is UEFI something like a whitelist of OSes and Applications tat are allowed by the UEFI firmware to load on a specific machine?
    Much like a Firmware Firewall to allow/dis-allow Boot stuff?

    This is what its been designed for?

    It would be nice if someone can answer this if he knwos without i have too read 4 full links(or perhaps post the info here if the li nks answer to my questions)
     
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  15. NikosGr

    NikosGr MDL Member

    Sep 3, 2012
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    Do tou think its easy READING 4 FULL HUGE LINKS while ar the same time asking in so many forums for so many matters?

    I just want a plain answer to what i ask i cant read the whole wikipedia(or similar) just to get an overall view.

    You wouldn't either.
     
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  16. chris34

    chris34 MDL Member

    Oct 28, 2009
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    #16 chris34, Jan 4, 2013
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2013

    why reinstall the OS? if it was to install another OS along windows 8, you only needed to disable Secure Boot in the Bios/UEFI to boot with your USB key make your partitions and install your other OS. Again, Secure boot is not enabled by Windows 8 it is activated (and disabled) in the BIOS/UEFI. You can safely enabled and disable, and re-enable it, in the BIOS UEFI. However, you cannot dualboot with secure boot enabled/activated if one of your OS doesn't support secure boot. If you plan to install linux along windows 8 with secure boot activated, google for linux and secure boot (and enjoy the reading).
     
  17. NikosGr

    NikosGr MDL Member

    Sep 3, 2012
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    Why are you being so hardheaded?
    I DO READ.
    But i also expect an anser to be plaon and simple from someone that knows the matter.
    I CANNOT READ THE WHOLE WIKIPEDIA JUST TO LEARN SOMETHING.
    IF YOU KEEP CALLING ME LAZY THEN YOU SHOULD READ THE 4 LINKS YOU POSTED AND ANSWER BACK SO TO ENLIGHT ME, YOURSELF and others here.
    but you wont do it.

    So dont call me names, if i am lazy with this context then you are too.

    TRY TO THINK!!!! I CANT READ EVERYTHING TO GET AN OVERALL VIEW OF 2 SIMPLE QUESTIONS AS TO WHAT THE USE OF UEFI IS.
    IAM NOT PARANOID HERE YOU ARE.

    And i did read the link i posted which you also posted and still doesnt explained my initial questions.Its not that i do not read.
     
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  18. NikosGr

    NikosGr MDL Member

    Sep 3, 2012
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    I need to reinstall Win8 because its legacy bases installed as it is now and NOT UEFI based setup.


    What if i was compelled to use GParted which i very much like for partitioning?


    How could i load it via usb as an acceptable signed application?

    And to take it further, how to let any Bootable USB ISO run without disabling SecureBoot but instead tell SecureBoot to let it be as a trusted Boot Application?

    Also the OSes(Win8, ubuntu 12.1) can be UEFI Setup'ed what about the Bootable USB Applications? They cannot be UEFI Setup'ed they just only need to be booted.

    How would all of the above be possible with UEFI's Secure Boot feature enabled? As i see it now only the OSes that were installed via the UEFI method can be allowes to boot by UEFI firmware itself.
     
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  19. Shenj

    Shenj MDL Expert

    Aug 12, 2010
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    SecureBoot will only allow boot loaders signed with specifig keys.. there is no point in secureboot if you basically don't want to use it.. just disable it :wallbash: :wallbash:
     
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  20. NikosGr

    NikosGr MDL Member

    Sep 3, 2012
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    Okey....

    Then if ALL th information we need its out there in the blue.....what is the purpose of existance of this techical forum?

    We can ALL read relevant links by fancy Googlying of our issues.

    Why ask in forums?


    If you dont want to help dont help, others might want to explain in plain english and in 3-4 lines the questions presented better than 4 full links would.
     
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