Win 7 networking Tip

Discussion in 'Windows 7' started by dgmry, Feb 21, 2012.

  1. dgmry

    dgmry MDL Novice

    Nov 22, 2009
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    Hi Everyone

    Just wanted to share a few things that have been plaguing me for over 2 years concerning Win7 networking. I currently have 9 PC's on my home network.MY laptop has the first install of Win7
    done in October of 2009.All the others I did over time except for one XP machine. Most these machines continually had problems with network sharing, except for 2 machines that always synced. My laptop was the worst. Most of the time it refused to connect to or allow other network shares. For over two years I tried every tip,trick and tweak I could find to no avail. They absolutely refused to play nice with each other.
    About six weeks ago I came across a post in another forum that stated to check and change if necessary any or all PC's on the network to HYBRID.This can be done in the registry. I did this and I'll be D****d it worked.
    This had become a Quest for me and I wasn"t about to give up. So far its been two months and everthings working fine.

    Second problem was in creating a network map.I have two wireless "G" routers on my network. I always got "windows could not create a network map". Again while researching I came across a post that sugessted changing the wireless modes to "g" only and again problem was solved.

    I still find it hard to believe Microsoft created such a networking mess. It seems to me that for most people it sets up fine but if a problem occurs it becomes a nightmare. I never had a problem with XP.
    I hope this helps someone at least as much as all of you at "MDL" have helped me.

    dgmry
     
  2. Canadian-Wolverine

    Canadian-Wolverine MDL Junior Member

    Feb 14, 2011
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    hybrid?
    pls explain.. :confused:

    thanx

    c-w
     
  3. wapanstore

    wapanstore MDL Novice

    Feb 22, 2012
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    Check you router, to see if it jas some form of firewall or access options. Many newer routers allow you to block sites there, and no way the PC user will know (unless they can log into the router).
     
  4. PhaseDoubt

    PhaseDoubt MDL Expert

    Dec 24, 2011
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    Currently I have sixteen devices on my local Windows network: five smart phones, four laptops, three netbooks, one iPod and three desktops. When the kids and grandkids come calling all at once, things on the network get a mite active. All computers are Windows 7 with one netbook being Windows XP Pro SP3.

    Maybe I'm lucky, but every device connected immediately and all connections are rock solid. Security is maxed out with every security option available in use.

    For me, Windows 7 was far easier than XP when it comes to networking. XP was a snap though once you keyed the correct parameters. Maybe I'm just lucky.
     
  5. chevell

    chevell MDL Novice

    Jul 30, 2009
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    The problem is that running dual routers on a single network is not the best idea, they aren't really meant to be used that way.

    It's best to use a single router with DHCP enabled, then use a network bridge or access point for the other connections.

    You can try disabling DHCP on one of the routers along with a few other adjustments that might help, but it may or may not be reliable.

    Also, wireless G is outdated, you would be much better off going to a more modern wireless/wired N router with a seperate access point or bridge instead. Updating the firmware on your old router might also help. You wouldn't have any networking problems with this type of set up.

    Networking with Windows 7 works perfectly fine. Most every problem I've seen has to do with the network set up or the A/V blocking connections.
     
  6. 100

    100 MDL Expert

    May 17, 2011
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    I'm sure the networking problems you're having aren't MS's fault, but most likely some network equipment configured incorrectly or just not working right.

    I remember using an older Netgear wireless access point at one point to bridge wired and wireless LAN, which worked fine most of the time, but some devices started having problems connecting to network services. Damn thing annoyed the hell out of me trying to figure out what was wrong, and it turned out the access point just liked to randomly drop IPv6 packets. Of course with IPv6 enabled by default nowadays (at least for local connectivity) that made the wireless network basically unusable for local network access and the occasional IPv6 web site.
     
  7. dgmry

    dgmry MDL Novice

    Nov 22, 2009
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    Canadian -Wolverine
    Hope this helps, Google for more info.

    "A hybrid computer network uses different communication standards simultaneously, such as Ethernet and WiFi. In networking terminology, a hybrid network--also called a hybrid network topology--combines the best features of two or more different networks."

    My setup consists of 2 wireless routers, a switch, a wireless printer,an Xbox and a PlayStation and 9 PC's, 3 of them XP and the others Win7.

    Checking node type with "cmd ipconfig /all" I found some of the machines node type was set as "peer to peer" and all the others "hybrid." Changing all the machines to "hybrid" fixed all my problems.

    As an experiment I recently installed Win7 Thin on an old dell SX270.
    It joined the network immediately. Checking node type showed hybrid.

    Severial days earlier I refurbished a Dell 2400. It would not join the network. I changed the node type from "peer to peer" to "hybrid and it connected.

    All other things being considered this worked for me and so far has been rock solid.


    Wapanstore
    Everything else was checked, rechecked and quad checked. As I've said I followed every suggestion I found and nothing worked except this.


    PhaseDoubt
    Just out of curiosity check your "node" type. I would like to know what its set at.

    Chevell
    Second router was introduced into the mix months ago. Dhcp is disabled. This problem existed way before this with a single router. I know G is outdated but it works well and will upgrade as they die.

    100
    Your probably right. But It seems to me having set up several small networks that when they work rite off the bat all's good. but when a problem occurs its hell to figure out. I don't recall having any big problems with XP or even 98. I believe in running out and buying new equipment only when something becomes totally unmanageable and I've reached the end of my rope.
    I've found the WWW full of others with simlar networking problems some of which have yet to be solved.
    Yesterday I set up a small network for a church. 1 Win7 and 2 XP. The Win7 was wired, the XP' s were wireless. Did all the usual checks.1 XP machine dropped connection occasionally and other would not join. I than changed node type to Hybrid and all's well. I will keep an eye on it and see what happens.
    I'm going to add this to my long list of checks. Actually, this is going to the top.
     
  8. PhaseDoubt

    PhaseDoubt MDL Expert

    Dec 24, 2011
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    Re: PhaseDoubt Just out of curiosity check your "node" type. I would like to know what its set at.

    Hybrid
     
  9. dgmry

    dgmry MDL Novice

    Nov 22, 2009
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    Anyone else care to check?
     
  10. 100

    100 MDL Expert

    May 17, 2011
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    It's set to "Hybrid" on my Windows 7 and Server 2008 R2 machines, except for one Win 7 machine where it's "Mixed", for whatever reason.