Dual partition for windows7 64bit

Discussion in 'Windows 7' started by Jim-ny, Aug 12, 2012.

  1. Jim-ny

    Jim-ny MDL Novice

    Aug 12, 2012
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    Hi, I have a problem with my new drive. I had A SATA drive that i put a DOS and NTFS partion on. I used the dos for Nortons ghost as a quick retore once the OS "windows 7" was installed. and if I ever got a virus or got slugish I would reboot with my dos bootup and once in dos just had to to drive, and type gohst11.exe and it woul aloow me to do do my quick restore to the original set up. I would exit andreboot. Just like the day I built it. Now my Problem. I purchased a SATA Solid State drive. and cant get the Dos partion to show up in my computer. I went to disk Mngt and it shws it there. ted to change the drive letter, and wont allow me to Re-format to Dos mode. I assume it's has something to do with the drive being Solid State. Any thoughts would be great thanks........
     
  2. PhaseDoubt

    PhaseDoubt MDL Expert

    Dec 24, 2011
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    I'm a simple sort of guy so I create only primary partitions and Windows allows me to have four per HDD. That's plenty for me and they're all NTFS ... I have always been a proponent of the KISS approach.

    For all my computers, currently seven in number, I keep a series of system images on either an internal "data" hard drive or an external USB HDD. I've used both the Windows 7 built in system image utility and Acronis True Image Home 2010. Restoring a full system with either is a matter of a few minutes (5-10 depending on the footprint of the system) and I've never had a problem with either with regard to making the image or restoring it. You do have to boot from a CD/DVD but I actually like having that boot process separate from the computer's normal boot process.

    I just have a hard time understanding how an SSD would be "less useful" than an HDD in any regard. I mean, SDDs are the eventual future of mass storage and surely they'll be every bit as good, convenient and easy to use as an HDD.