how to properly ground a case?

Discussion in 'PC Hardware' started by x86, Feb 16, 2018.

  1. x86

    x86 MDL Addicted

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  2. Michaela Joy

    Michaela Joy MDL Crazy Lady

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    Usually there is plating around the mounting holes on both sides of the MoBo which is grounded.
    The fiber washers are there to keep the MoBo from cracking when you torque dowm on the screw (or hex nut).

    You should always check with a multimeter set to ohms and make sure that there's a proper ground.

    "Measure twice, cut once." ;)
     
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  3. Joe C

    Joe C MDL Guru

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    Use a anti-static wrist strap and mat and if your dealing with a lot of static, try humidifying the air. It'll help keep that static to a minimum. Remove any carpeting in the work area
     
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  4. x86

    x86 MDL Addicted

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    So, I should use washers on the top side of the board (before I bolt it down). You are right, since the plating is on both sides of the board, conductivity can be achieved by the bottom side anyways. As for the multimeter, I think I ll have to call a friend!

    Always do the wrist strap. But no humidifier I m afraid. Humidity in here in around 40 to 60%.
     
  5. MrG

    MrG MDL Addicted

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    I use the grounded electrical outlet in my office, its eventually connected to a metal exterior water pipe that goes underground to the water meter.
     
  6. Joe C

    Joe C MDL Guru

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    #6 Joe C, Feb 17, 2018
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2018
    I've installed a multitude of motherboards, never had to worry about using any type of paper washers. I normally just screw it into the brass stand-offs on the motherboard plate and call it good. I have an older power supply here, I'll pop it open to see if the ground from the wall receptacle has any connections to the frame of this power supply
     
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  7. Joe C

    Joe C MDL Guru

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    #7 Joe C, Feb 17, 2018
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2018
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  8. MrG

    MrG MDL Addicted

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    I need to go by home depot for one of their ($5.50 USD) 3-wire receptacle testers to be sure.
    I know there are black, white & copper wires connected to the receptacle.
    When I look at the photo I took of the wiring in the electrical panel, its hard to tell which is which, at least the electrician that wired this house was consistent w/ hooking all the black wires to the breakers :)
    I did have another electrician install a (gas generator) Transfer Switch, that's why all the other wires are in the (attached 72dpi) photo.

    *Ya its a old panel w/ the push button breakers

    S0893398b.JPG
     
  9. Michaela Joy

    Michaela Joy MDL Crazy Lady

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    #9 Michaela Joy, Feb 17, 2018
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2018
    If you put the washers underneath the MoBo, you give it some protection from vibration. I would do that. ;)

    A cheap multimeter is a good thing to have around the house. I have 3 of them, including a tiny one that I keep in my purse. :)

    "Chance favors the prepared mind" :)
     
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  10. Joe C

    Joe C MDL Guru

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    Vibration?.... are you taking this thing on a train or something. Once you have the mount screws tightened down, it shouldn't be going anywhere if it's secured to the motherboard plate.... no?
     
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  11. Joe C

    Joe C MDL Guru

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    And I didn't know I had a purse
     
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  12. Joe C

    Joe C MDL Guru

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    #13 Joe C, Feb 17, 2018
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2018
    That shouldn't matter if the pc is suspended, because the ground on the pc should be grounded via the ground on the wall receptacle. You can use a volt meter to check this ground on the wall socket. From the neutral side of the wall outlet to ground you should see 0 volts and from the neutral to the line side you'll see the total volts provided (not sure where you are if it's 120v or 220v) and from the line side to the ground you should see the provided volts. If you do not get a volt reading from the line side to ground then you might need to get an electrician to fix that for you. Very old houses here in the U.S. do not have a proper ground wire...only a neutral and a line side.
     
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  13. Lemarleidyeisk

    Lemarleidyeisk MDL Novice

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    I have my pc sitting on a wood case i didnt realize this was this much of an issue
     
  14. tonto11

    tonto11 MDL Addicted

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    #16 tonto11, Feb 26, 2018
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2018
    US and related countries use the U ground safety plug . which includes a working ground carrying load current and a safety ground for fault current.
    The U pin is a bit longer so it makes the safety contact first

    The UK safety plug is like the U ground plug on steroids big solid brass, same principle as U ground , it's the ugliest plug on the planet but it works good ,

    EU countries use the two pin plug one of which is ground but it's a working ground, carrying load current
    not a safety ground

    Some German tools and extension cords ( I have several of these ) include a safety ground ( like the US U ground but using two small spring clips at 90 deg. to the pins these make contact last but do provide the protection for the tool user of a safety ground.
    These make for pretty big connectors, particularly on extension cords
    Tools of course can be plugged into a regular two pin socket, at which point you loose the safety ground

    There more than you ever wanted to know about safety grounds


    ...T