Installing Ubuntu/Linux Mint on UEFI System with Windows 8/8.1/10

Discussion in 'Linux' started by John Sutherland, Jul 26, 2015.

  1. John Sutherland

    John Sutherland MDL Addicted

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    #1 John Sutherland, Jul 26, 2015
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2016
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  2. John Sutherland

    John Sutherland MDL Addicted

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    #2 John Sutherland, Jul 26, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2017
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  3. John Sutherland

    John Sutherland MDL Addicted

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    #3 John Sutherland, Jul 26, 2015
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  4. John Sutherland

    John Sutherland MDL Addicted

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    #4 John Sutherland, Jul 26, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2017
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    Section 4: Post-Installation

    1.) On your first reboot after installation, you might find that your machine boots directly into Windows, without the grub boot menu appearing and offering you the choice to boot into Linux. If you somehow failed to install grub in the EFI system partition during installation, it's your own fault. The solution is to repeat the installation and get it right.

    However, if you certain you did this correctly, then the reason is this: the Windows boot manager, bootmgfw.efi, is still in control of the boot process and the Linux boot manager, grubx64.efi, is not. You can change this from Windows by doing the following:

    Boot into Windows and open the Command Prompt as Administrator. Then use the bcdedit command to change the path and put the Linux bootmanager grubx64.efi in control.

    bcdedit /set {bootmgr} path \EFI\ubuntu\grubx64.efi

    Note 1: This works with either Ubuntu or Linux Mint. The folder named “ubuntu” and the bootloader “grubx64.efi” are common to both OS's, since Linux Mint is based on Ubuntu.

    Note 2: The release notes for Linux Mint do not recommend using Secure Boot. However, Ubuntu does offer a digitally signed boot manager to be used with Secure Boot. If you wish to use Secure Boot with Ubuntu, then do this:

    bcdedit /set {bootmgr} path \EFI\ubuntu\shimx64.efi

    Note 3: The path to the Windows boot manager is \EFI\Microsoft\Boot\bootmgfw.efi in case you ever want to change it back.

    2.) Change Power Settings: Doing the initial system update can take time, and I like to be sure that the system doesn't go to sleep during this process. Go to Menu > Preferences > Power Management. It's very similar to Windows. Make sure that “Suspend when inactive” is set to “Never”. You can always go back and change this later on.

    3.) Change Software Sources: Go to Menu > Administration > Software Sources. You will be prompted for your root password to open this one. Click the bar marked “Main”, then be patient and let it search for the fastest mirror site. When it's done searching, the fastest one will be displayed at the top. Click on it and then click “Apply”.

    Now click the bar marked “Base” and repeat the same procedure as above. Note: You don't necessarily have to select the fastest mirror site if you don't want to; you're free to choose any one on the list.

    To finish, go up and click “Update the Cache”. When this completes, close the window.

    4.) Initial System Update: Go to Menu > Administration > Update Manager - or - click the small icon shaped like a shield on the right side of the taskbar. You should see a red “x” in the middle indicating that critical updates are waiting to be installed. Then click “Install Updates”. Again, you will be prompted for you root password. After that, it's only a matter of sitting back and waiting.

    Note: Sometimes the very first update will be only for the Update Manager itself. After it completes, then you'll see the screen refresh and find the complete list is displayed.

    5.) Install Packages: There are three basic ways to install packages: Using Synaptic, which is the main repository for all approved packages. Using Software Manager, which is a graphical version of Synaptic, but not as complete. Or using the Gdebi Package Installer to install .deb packages. This is done by downloading a .deb package, right clicking it, selecting “Open with Gdebi Package Installer”, then installing.

    I'm not going to go into great detail here. It's really up to you what you want to install. Here are just a few that I suggest:

    amd64-microcode: microcode patches for AMD processors

    intel-microcode: microcode patches for Intel processors

    gufw: the graphic front-end for ufw, the universal firewall, which itself is installed but not activated or configured

    Chromium: the Linux version of the Chrome web browser

    6.) Install the Grub Customizer: This allows you to modify the order of the grub boot menu. You'll notice that Linux appears at the top and Windows at the bottom of the menu. If you don't make a selection, then the first item on the menu will boot after 8 seconds. I'm always concerned about the chance of someone downloading and installing updates for Windows, then rebooting the machine into Linux instead of Windows if they're not paying attention during reboot. I do not know what the outcome of doing this would be, nor would I care to find out.


    To install the Grub Customizer, open the Terminal and enter the following commands:

    sudo add-apt-repository ppa:Danielrichter2007/grub-customizer
    sudo apt-get update
    sudo apt-get install grub-customizer

    After installing, open Grub Customizer and click the line where you see the entry for Windows
    displayed. Then use the “up” arrow to move it from the bottom to the top of the list. After doing so, click “File” and “Save”, then click “File” and “Quit”. The next time you boot, you should see Windows at the top of the boot order.

    7.) Change Linux from UTC to Local Time: You will notice that the clock on Windows is off after installing Linux. This is because Linux uses UTC and Windows uses Local Time. You have two choices here:

    The easiest thing to do is change Linux to use Local Time. Open the Terminal and enter “sudo gedit /etc/default/rcS”. Find the line “UTC=yes” and change “yes” to “no”.

    #Set UTC=yes if your hardware clock is set to UTC (GMT)
    #Set UTC=no to use local time - dual boot with Windows
    UTC=no


    After making the change, click “File” and “Save”, then click “File” and Quit”.

    If you enjoy making changes to the Windows registry (who doesn't?), you can set Windows to use UTC. Create a file named “WindowsTimeFixUTC.reg” containing the following, then merge it into the registry.

    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\TimeZoneInformation]
    "RealTimeIsUniversal"=dword:00000001

    Note: This works in Windows 7. I've read conflicting stories about whether or not it works in Windows 8/8.1/10, and I haven't had the chance or the courage to try it. In any case, be sure to backup the registry before trying this. And if you're not a big fan of fooling with the registry, then make the change in Linux instead. It's easier and safer.









     
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  5. Skaendo

    Skaendo MDL Addicted

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    Nice job John. This should start the stickys in the Linux forum!
     
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  6. prmcmanus

    prmcmanus MDL Novice

    Sep 27, 2014
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    tl;dr


    Thanks for taking the time to include such detailed steps, but it really isn't necessary.
    Step 1 - Install Windows
    Step 2 - Resize Windows in Disk Management
    Step 3 - Install Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Grub2 will pick up the Windows install and add it to the boot menu :)
     
  7. John Sutherland

    John Sutherland MDL Addicted

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  8. MrMagic

    MrMagic MDL Guru

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    Is there any way to install 32bit as UEFI ?

    I have a 1GB RAM tablet that I want Linux running on, currently running Win 10, it can only install UEFI/GPT (Secure boot) - No way to disable either

    It has a 64bit CPU, but 1GB RAM...
     
  9. Daz

    Daz MDL Developer / Admin
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    If the tablet come with a 32-bit version of Windows then you won't be able to install Linux onto it easily due to the 32-bit UEFI. You'd need to get a custom bootia32.efi to drop onto a USB, but as you can't disable secure boot then you'll probably run into another problem at that stage.

    In general Linux isn't great on Windows tablets. I've tested it myself in the past and the accelerometer, battery, touchscreen, WiFi, bluetooth and audio were totally screwed.
     
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  10. John Sutherland

    John Sutherland MDL Addicted

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  11. MrMagic

    MrMagic MDL Guru

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    Ah right, damn, sounds too much trouble for what will likely be a bad experience then

    Thanks for the heads up

    Yea, it came with 8.1 32bit UEFI, there is a BIOS(ish) type thing, but only has like 1 option and secure boot can not be disabled from there, and it's a PITA to get into any other settings as they only work with K&M via USB hub etc etc

    I`ll just leave Windows on it I think lol
     
  12. John Sutherland

    John Sutherland MDL Addicted

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  13. MrMagic

    MrMagic MDL Guru

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    Thanks, not gonna bother if next to nothing works afterwards - not much point having a Linux tablet that you can't use :)
     
  14. oliverjia

    oliverjia MDL Addicted

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    Installation of Ubuntu x64 is a lot easier. It's installer can pick up Windows 10 installation and offer to install Ubuntu alongside Windows 10. Also there is no need to disable secure boot. AND you don't have to specify to install boot loader onto the /EFI partition. Just select /sda or /sdb etc and Ubuntu will install bootloader to EFI automatically. Tested on two of my desktop computers and one Toshiba laptop. All works fine.
     
  15. LEGGYMAMBO

    LEGGYMAMBO MDL Novice

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    Been a long time Windows user, going back to nearly day one, and been a beta tester from Win 95 (Chicago) days. Installed Linux Mint about a week ago and absolutely loving it so far, just wish I'd done it sooner.

    Still dual booting with Windows 8.1 at present but hoping in time I'll just stick with Linux.

    My advice to anyone wanting to try is definitely give it a go. Will be a huge learning process but certain this time investment will pay off in the long run.
     
  16. BJ0RN

    BJ0RN MDL HTTP-uploader

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    @John

    Doing the command ls /sys/firmware returns acpi memmap when using UEFI Hybrid
    Using UEFI Native just returns "No OS detected"
    Help :D
     
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  17. f33nix

    f33nix MDL Member

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    #18 f33nix, Sep 10, 2015
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2015
    Bring forth some system details young sir! :D
    Then maybe John/Someone else can assist.

    I have been prodding this about for a few days myself, but having big issues loading Grub.
    In the past I have always had success with Windows/Linux with MBR non-EFI.
    Now with using EFI I have been getting a headache getting it to boot. The closest I have come is booting Grub to a command prompt, typing EXIT and then it boots correctly :g: I am now going to re-install Linux from scratch again to see if I can use a WHOLE hard drive I have spare as it seems this maybe the best solution to use for me.


    EDIT: Nope, it is not happy. Got it to boot Windows/Linux, which of course was brilliant. Then updated Linux kernel to then get dumped into Grub rescue, and typing HELP into the command line did not yield any help :D I never have had issues in the past with running on MBR/BIOS just GPT/EFI :weep: Perhaps during these long Winter nights I may wipe whole PC and load Linux without any exising Windows partitions :g:
     
  18. SOCRATE_MMXII

    SOCRATE_MMXII MDL Expert

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    Linux and UEFI don't get along too well. Better use MBR.
     
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  19. f33nix

    f33nix MDL Member

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    Just to update my above post and it ties into your statement.

    I was getting issues adding Linux to my main machine with existing Windows 8.1 with GPT/EFI... Grub rescue.
    I asked my boy if he was happy to have his machine wiped and Linux loaded (he has used before) and he agreed.
    This time Linux was happy to create a /boot/efi partition then the rest of the drive as /
    Boots stable and to desktop each and every time with EFI bios.
    The only difference I can see is that with my main machine my EFI partition was FAT32, and Linux create the EFI partition as VFAT :g:


    Conclusion for me is that trying to shoe horn Linux into existing EFI setup of Windows can be troublesome (at least it was for me)
    I will during the Winter try and erase my machine and go "native" with Linux.


    p.s. I agree with you in regards to MBR working with Linux/Windows dual boot as I never had issues until EFI came along.