New build quesstions

Discussion in 'PC Hardware' started by zxcviop, Aug 2, 2017.

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  1. zxcviop

    zxcviop MDL Novice

    May 19, 2017
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    Hi there, I am planning a new build. However, I found myself confused about those new hardware.

    I am just planning, so I haven't got a budget limit (yet). I won't be building it now and I can wait for something new or reviews. Use case: gaming, possible: video + photo editing / music production(learning) / 3d modeling(learning)

    1. Can I future proof with threadripper?
    a. Will there be new CPUs on the X399 platform?
    b. Can threadipper handle future software in, say, the next 5 years?​
    2. AMD or Nvidia? I haven't got any monitor yet. But I have a target to get 3 monitors, I can buy them progressively (if I don't have enough money, I can buy them 1 by 1)
    a. GTX 1080 ti and future proof?
    b. GTX 106/70 and upgrade later?
    c. Vege 64 and freesync?​
    3. Or will you just choose to buy a Yoga 720 rather than a PC?

    Thank you in advance, for answering my questions.
     
  2. bpwnes

    bpwnes MDL Member

    Aug 11, 2015
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    Going to try to make this quick, but sorry if it turns into a wall of text.

    If you build a really good gaming PC, it will pretty much do everything else you want.

    1. Depends on your needs, but nothing is ever future proof. Buying the latest thing tends to yield the best results.
    a. I haven't seen anything yet beyond the 1900X series. They could potentially release some faster versions of what they have, but I doubt it.
    b. Yes.​
    2. I've used both in the past but always preferred nVidia. They have better driver support and they're faster, more efficient, and quieter (in most cases). nVidia is also seems to be better supported in the content creation market as well, but it heavily depends on what programs you plan to use (most I've used have CUDA support, but not all do).
    a. A 1080 Ti would be excellent and serve you well for many years.
    b. I've built some semi-low-budget video editors with an i7 and 1060/70 and they seem to work well for what they needed (at most 1080p). I caution people about the "upgrade later" mindset, as you typically spend more money in the long run. Also if you need to save money, the video card isn't necessarily the area you want to take it away from. It pretty much dictates how well games run.
    c. Look up charts and compare Vega with nVidia's cards. Price per performance is usually pretty linear, so generally the more you spend, the more power you get, but there are exceptions. Freesync is optional, and in my experience it's a little annoying to get working correctly.​
    3. I wouldn't. Laptops sacrifice most of their power for portability. If you want both, then you'll probably have to shell out more than you're willing to spend, and it will be very heavy. Also, don't buy a Lenovo unless it's a Think branded product (unless you are always super careful not to drop it), never buy an HP laptop, and the only worthwhile Dell laptops are Latitude and Precision.

    Most games are primarily single-threaded, so having a huge processor doesn't actually give you more FPS. In content creation, however, a processor with 32 threads will be way faster than one with 8.

    If you're going to do a lot of video editing, you might need to look into setting up some fast storage just for editing. One cheap way is to use some large WD Blacks and maybe make a RAID0 array and have somewhere else to store done projects.

    I suggest you start looking around and get a handle on your options and set a budget of how much you think you want to spend. Most people I've built machines for tend to go a little over budget when it's all said and done, so keep that in mind.
     
  3. zxcviop

    zxcviop MDL Novice

    May 19, 2017
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    Thx for your informative reply.

    There is nothing I can disagree with. But I really didn't know rolling upgrade costs you more.

    So, I guess that I can keep X399 platform and I can upgrade to a newer threadripper in the future.

    You are absolutely right about the laptop part, I am typing this on a HP laptop which had a s**tty touchscreen and has a charging DRM for USB-C. I think I am going to pour most of my wallet into the PC and get a cheap laptop.

    How will you compare threadripper with ryzen?
     
  4. MS_User

    MS_User MDL Guru

    Nov 30, 2014
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    u dont have to go that cheap on a laptop around $550 gets u something pretty decent with touch screen.
     
  5. zxcviop

    zxcviop MDL Novice

    May 19, 2017
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    Any suggestion for a pen-enabled laptop with stellar battery life, everything else don't matter.
     
  6. MS_User

    MS_User MDL Guru

    Nov 30, 2014
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    well u have 2 option dell or lenovo is real nice to and u cant beat their prices.
     
  7. zxcviop

    zxcviop MDL Novice

    May 19, 2017
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    Model # please?
     
  8. zxcviop

    zxcviop MDL Novice

    May 19, 2017
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    #10 zxcviop, Aug 5, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2017
    (OP)
    This looks good, thank you so much. But it seems that it doesn't support pen.

    I can't believe that they are still selling HDD laptop at such a price. Shouldn't we already get a SSD for that amount? Neither does this support pen.

    Thank you anyway. but I think the current notebooks with pen function are way too overpriced.
     
  9. MS_User

    MS_User MDL Guru

    Nov 30, 2014
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    well the pen u can buy separately and as for HD u can later upgraded to a SSD their getting cheaper all the time and by next year which is just around the corner prices will drop more.... now were talking about boxes under $550.