Someone explain to me memory management please

Discussion in 'Windows 8' started by ian82, Feb 8, 2014.

  1. ian82

    ian82 MDL Expert

    Mar 7, 2012
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  2. lllFATAL1TY

    lllFATAL1TY MDL Member

    Dec 21, 2013
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    #2 lllFATAL1TY, Feb 8, 2014
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2014
    memory.PNG

    support.microsoft.com/kb/978610


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    looks like you have too much Standby memory, you can use RAMMap to empty it (Empty > Empty Standby List)

    technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/ff700229.aspx
     
  3. ian82

    ian82 MDL Expert

    Mar 7, 2012
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    yeah but how come so much standby memory? that's a whooping 30 GB of standby memory?!

    I also thought that once you run winsat formal, and it detects that you have an SSD, it won't actually allow superfetch to cache stuff (correct me if I'm wrong)
     
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  4. lllFATAL1TY

    lllFATAL1TY MDL Member

    Dec 21, 2013
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    next time this happen you can use RAMMap to check which process is taking so much standby memory (Processes tab) ;)
     
  5. Helmutcheese

    Helmutcheese MDL Member

    Jul 29, 2009
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    #5 Helmutcheese, Feb 8, 2014
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2014
  6. eydee

    eydee Guest

    The real answer is superfetch. Google it.
     
  7. Garbellano

    Garbellano MDL Addicted

    Aug 13, 2012
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    cached memory. The more shared, the better (in speeds terms). But you should stop using s**tty software (like windows :p) like webroot, qtorrent, etc. They use a lot the hdd and that is cached. As you can see.
     
  8. ALGIRO82

    ALGIRO82 MDL Novice

    Feb 8, 2014
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    i have same problem solved with RAMMap :D
     
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  9. Enigma256

    Enigma256 MDL Senior Member

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    #9 Enigma256, Feb 10, 2014
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2014
    Ugh. The ignorance in this thread is astounding. How the hell is this a "problem"? Standby is, for all practical intents and purposes, free. Except it's better than free.

    When Windows loads data from disk to memory (any kind of data; a data file, an executable, anything), it uses memory that hadn't previously been used ("free" memory). When it is done with that file, it marks that memory as "standby". The only difference between "standby" and "free" is that the former still contains old data. And if memory is required and there isn't enough "free" memory, "standby" memory is used instead.

    Why not clear out that old data when it's done? Well, first, zeroing memory isn't computationally free. The CPU has to do work (though not a lot) to blank out memory, so why do it unless you need to? This way, memory is blanked only when it's actually needed to be blanked and recycled. Second, what if that file is accessed again? Now instead of incurring disk access a second time, the system can just flip that chunk of memory back into active status, with zero disk access.

    Basically, this is a common-sense feature of any properly-designed memory management system.

    The one and only benefit to clearing standby memory is if you're paranoid about security and want to make sure that sensitive data is wiped from memory (and I say "paranoid" because the kernel will always blank out memory that a program allocates, so forcible access of such latent data requires either kernel-level access or physical access to the RAM module).

    This also has nothing to do with Superfetch. The only way in which Superfetch plays a role is that through preemptive file loads, it causes more files to be loaded, which causes memory to be marked as standby at a somewhat faster rate. But even with SF disabled, any system that incurs heavy disk access will quickly reach a point where all free memory is standby.
     
  10. murphy78

    murphy78 MDL DISM Enthusiast

    Nov 18, 2012
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    What enigma said...

    It's caching previously used data. It doesn't prevent the future use of the memory. It simply uses the free memory until you need more free memory.
     
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  11. Helmutcheese

    Helmutcheese MDL Member

    Jul 29, 2009
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    Same old story and same as the OP 's previous thread 4 weeks ago and 100x the same old Q gets asked before.

    Only so many times you can be arsed to try explain it so I keep it short and sweet, the Task Manager shows its cached in the above screenshot.

    Wonder who above peep is calling ignorant.