Vista vs Vista64

Discussion in 'Windows Vista' started by comandoed, Mar 4, 2009.

  1. comandoed

    comandoed MDL Novice

    Feb 20, 2008
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    I will soon have computer with mobo IntelD975XBX2, Q6600 Slcar, 4GB memory, 8600GTS, 3 HDD.

    Which of the two is recommended Vista or Vista64? And why?
    Not into gaming.

    thanks
     
  2. vistadude

    vistadude MDL Member

    Oct 7, 2008
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    With the current specs, probably the speed difference will be small between the OS's. But with vista 32, you leave no room to upgrade memory. With vista 64, you can upgrade to 6 or 8 gb ram and get less vista disk thrashing and better performance. If you're absolutely certain you won't upgrade ram, go with vista 32 for best compatibility, but if you have even the slightest inclination to upgrade in the future, go with vista 64.
     
  3. HMonk

    HMonk MDL Addicted

    Nov 3, 2008
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    #3 HMonk, Mar 4, 2009
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2009
    x86 v. x64

    Based on my observations, I have concluded that there are two predominating rationales that impel soft- and hardware purchases: what does one want v. what does one need. How many people have to have the latest version of Excel while not being able to utilize 95% of its capabilities? If you did not already know, the answer is the overwhelming majority of them. Many people have to have the latest quad-core CPU even though there are scant few applications that take advantage of quad-core technology; there are fewer yet users who work with those applications. To answer you question intelligibly, knowing that you are not into gaming is it is insufficient. Perhaps you are involved in complex photo or video editing; perhaps you crunch numbers to the nth degree for NASA. You get the point, surely.

    Driver availability is also a significant issue; some peripherals will not work. Compatibility is another. For example, I have not checked lately but last I knew Adobe Flash is unavailable for x64 browsing; if running IE, e.g., you must run both x86 and x64 versions for surfing if you want to be able to view every site. Some AV progs won't do x64; lots of progs won't. Perhaps I have made another point.

    In the last analysis, you have to ask yourself what advantage, if any, would you realize if you ran an x64 OS - in exchange for a migraine! :eek:

    I am a gamer, frequently launch multiple hogs simultaneously, and "only" run an entirely x86 OS with an X3 processor. I do not buy what I don't need for three reasons: (1) I don't need it; (2) it costs more; and (3) if and or when I need it will be cheaper, useful, and relatively trouble free to operate. There is a fourth, rather personal reason that I do not indulge in things I do not need: I have learned to master my hormones. :cool:

    I suggest you do a bit of research on the pros and cons of x64, to include comments by users.

    Monk
     
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  4. comandoed

    comandoed MDL Novice

    Feb 20, 2008
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    Thank you VistaDude and Monk. You provide good insights. I think
    I'll continue with x86. For now.
     
  5. vistadude

    vistadude MDL Member

    Oct 7, 2008
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    Come on Monk, we all know you have a mouse with a blue LED specifically cause it looks cooler than red, not because it has anything to do with performance and you have a SuperDrive and the rest of us bums only have a a dual layer drive :)
     
  6. HSChronic

    HSChronic MDL Expert

    Aug 25, 2007
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    More and more stuff is getting written for x64, but like Monk said unless you are running 64-bit processor/memory intensive tasks x86 is fine. You have to remember that most apps are not written for x64 based operating systems either, so even though it is x64 it might just be running everything in compatibility mode (also known as WOW64). If you are going to be upgrading the RAM because of memory/processor intensive tasks then x64 is the way to go.


    You just have to ask yourself these questions

    Am I going to need more than 3 (in versions other than Ultimate), or 4 gb of RAM? Yes, then x64. No, then x86

    Do all my apps work in x64 and have been tested or verified? Yes, then x64 might be for you. No, then you need to stick with x86.

    Are there drivers for everything I need that will work with 64-bit versions of Windows? Yes, then again 64 bit might work for you. No, then you need x86.

    Like everyone said most cases x86 is fine, unless you have a specific need for a 64-bit environment.
     
  7. HMonk

    HMonk MDL Addicted

    Nov 3, 2008
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    Moi?

    Ok, OK . . . but I've come along way.

    Late last year I built a new box (AMD Phenom II X3 720, ASUS M3A79-T Deluxe mobo, Zalman 750W PSU, and a couple of Sapphire ATi Radeon 4830 GPUs. Kept my "old" HDDs, CD-RW, and 2 DVD-RW dual layers (one a lightscribe). I also got a naked full tower (no fans, temp LCDs, etc.)

    Truth be known, however, my previous build (late 2005) was graced with case that included a few fans, including a blue-LED front HDD fan, and a clear plastic side panel. :cool: After a few days of being awe struck by the blue glow next to my desk, I decided it was too bright for my nighttime gaming junkets. In addition, the mid tower case was not adequately cooled, even considering its snazzy but useless air intake port on the side panel in the area of the CPU and its three fans. Eventually, I got rid of the dinky fans, took the side panel off, and placed two 6-inch very quiet fans at either end of the box. Together they cover the CPU, GPUs, HDDs, and PSU nicely. But that blue glow from next to my desk is gone. :(

    Oh, my mouse: it is as old as I am; a 4-button Logitech USB ball. (I can't keep up with the newer stud muffins) ;)

    Monk
     
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