What are your views on the #MeToo movement?

Discussion in 'Serious Discussion' started by yashkhan, Oct 19, 2018.

  1. yashkhan

    yashkhan MDL Senior Member

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    What are your views on the #MeToo movement?
     
  2. Tiger-1

    Tiger-1 MDL Guru

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  3. Joe C

    Joe C MDL Guru

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  4. catsmoke

    catsmoke MDL Novice

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    My view is no different than reality, which is that women have been abused and exploited by men since prehistory, up until today.

    The lot of a human female is one of suffering and fear.

    I don't know how any of them stay sane, due to their having to be on the defensive, every second of their lives.
     
  5. Joe C

    Joe C MDL Guru

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    #5 Joe C, Oct 26, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2018
    Then you agree that it is o.k. to wait 20, 30 or even 35 years or more to recall that you may have been groped and now being offended by that, you now decide to make a report on it?
     
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  6. Michaela Joy

    Michaela Joy MDL Crazy Lady

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    @Joe C: Sometimes, it takes more courage than you can muster to face a thing like sexual abuse. And sometimes it takes 20 or so years to convince yourself
    that it's not your fault and there's no reason to be ashamed. That's why so many people just hide it and move on. But the damage to your psyche stays with you,
    tainting every relationship and making your life almost unbearable.

    That goes for both Men and Women.

    How do I know this? Because I estimate that about 70% of my GFs have been abused, both physically and sexually.

    One of my BFFs came to me and asked me to help her commit assisted suicide. She's HIV positive, because she was raped by someone with AIDS.
    He's long been dead, and she's left with the scars (and HIV)

    I cried then just as I'm crying now.

    I'm glad that she came to me. I told her that I'd move heaven and earth to help her live, but I'd rather die than even consider hurting her.

    This was about a year ago. She's since got her treatments in order and is on the mend.

    If one abused person can get help, then it's worth it. More times than not, it's not about getting revenge or money; it's about letting it out
    and freeing yourself from the pain of carrying a burden like that by yourself.
     
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  7. Joe C

    Joe C MDL Guru

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    I believe there are some women that have abused the MeToo movement for personal political motives. Some women have become so hyper sensitive about this that they accuse 9yr children of abuse. I do feel for women that have been abused and they do have legitimate reasons but those reasons are clouded by those that are looking to take advantage of this movement for their own personal motives.
    How is John Q Public going to know what is a legit complaint or one that has an ulterior motive?
     
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  8. John Sutherland

    John Sutherland MDL Addicted

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    #8 John Sutherland, Nov 1, 2018
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2018
    George Soros: Holy crap! Someone sent me a bomb in the mail!

    Hillary and Bill Clinton: #MeToo

    Barak Obama: #MeToo

    John Brennan (and CNN): #MeToo

    Eric Holder (and Debbie Wasserman Schultz): #MeToo

    Maxine Waters: #MeToo

    Robert De Niro: #MeToo

    Joe Biden: #MeToo

    Corey Booker: #MeToo

    James Clapper: #MeToo

    Kamala Harris: #MeToo

    Tom Steyr: #MeToo

    The moral of the story? "You reap what you sow".*

    *Credits to Reverend Jeremiah Wright for the quote
     
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  9. John Sutherland

    John Sutherland MDL Addicted

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    #9 John Sutherland, Nov 1, 2018
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2018
    Getting back on topic, I admit that I feel the same way. In my opinion, women who have experienced any form of abuse (physical, psychological, or sexual) do have the right to speak out. They have the right to name their abusers and to seek justice no matter if it happened 3 weeks, 3 months, 3 years, or even 30 years ago. That being said, they should never assume that everyone should automatically believe them just because of their gender. There has to be some sort of proof. In any court of law, the burden of proof lies with the accuser, not with the accused. And recent history has shown that making false accusations before a court of law can have severe consequences:

    The Duke University Lacrosse Team: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duke_lacrosse_case & https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crystal_Mangum

    A Long Island woman sentenced to three years in prison: https://6abc.com/ex-college-student-sent-to-prison-for-false-rape-accusation/4042954/

    Another Long Island woman facing a six million dollar lawsuit: https://nypost.com/2018/06/30/false-college-rape-allegation-destroyed-my-life-suit/

    There is truly a danger here. If we take people solely at their word, without any form of proof, and punish people based purely on other's accusations, our society would be turned upside-down. An example of this is what happened to the people of East Germany during the Cold War. The Stasi, the official state security service of the German Democratic Republic, ran a program that openly encouraged the public to act as informants, and to turn in anyone who criticized the government in any way. Informants were made to feel important and were given material or social incentives. It was believed that the best informants were those whose jobs entailed frequent contact with the public. A large number of Stasi informants were tram conductors, janitors, doctors, nurses and teachers. By the time East Germany collapsed in 1989, the Stasi employed 91,015 employees and had 173,081 informants. About one out of every 63 East Germans collaborated with the Stasi.

    Many informants saw this as a way to win over the trust of their Stasi handlers, to increase their status as a "good citizen", to reap the rewards of cooperating, and to escape any chance of being accused themselves. As a result of this, a large portion of the East German population was arrested and punished based purely on unsubstantiated accusations. A feeling of acute paranoia gripped nearly every citizen, not knowing who was watching you and who would turn on you. Co-workers, friends, and even your own relatives could not be trusted. To this day, nearly 20 years later, many former East Germans are still suffering from the psychological effects of this and are being treated professionally.
     
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  10. Joe C

    Joe C MDL Guru

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