Windows 7 System Image, also includes Second Partition !?

Discussion in 'Windows 7' started by BMW, May 4, 2011.

  1. BMW

    BMW MDL Novice

    Mar 23, 2011
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    #1 BMW, May 4, 2011
    Last edited: May 4, 2011
    when I select Create System Image in Windows 7,

    it selects both my C & D partitions...


    C has Windows 7 Ultimate OS

    D has only video / audio files


    both C & D are partitions on a single HDD


    there is no option to de-select D drive image ....
    which is strange & consumes unnecessary space on my external backup drive


    Another Question :: if I don't select system image, and instead 'backup' my entire C drive,
    can it be restored as a fully functional OS on a formatted drive ? ...or can only a system image do that ?


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    UPDATE :: extra info as asked my members :

    Yup in Disk Management , Windows 7 'C' drive is the last partition shown, with 'D' drive the partition before it

    Custom Built PC ...

    HISTORY

    D had XP (was called C at that time...years ago ! )

    C had Vista Ultimate

    then had Upgraded from Vista Ultimate to 7 Ultimate

    and formatted the D drive, to use as a regular NTFS parition to store media files...
     
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  2. zahnoo

    zahnoo MDL Senior Member

    Feb 2, 2011
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    Do you supposed this could happen if he created D: not as a primary partition but mounted it as an empty NTFS folder? I've only done that once but the new partition showed up as a folder on C: with the name I chose for it.
     
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  3. zahnoo

    zahnoo MDL Senior Member

    Feb 2, 2011
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    yeah, and I seem to remember a partition that's mounted as a folder shows a green border in Disk Management. It's been a long time.
     
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  4. BMW

    BMW MDL Novice

    Mar 23, 2011
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    #4 BMW, May 4, 2011
    Last edited: May 4, 2011
    (OP)
    Yup , Windows 7 'C' drive is the last partition shown, with 'D' drive the partition before it


    Custom Built PC ...


    HISTORY

    D had XP (was called C at that time...years ago ! )

    C had Vista Ultimate

    then had Upgraded from Vista Ultimate to 7 Ultimate


    and formatted the D drive, to use as a regular NTFS parition to store media files...
     
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  5. BMW

    BMW MDL Novice

    Mar 23, 2011
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    #5 BMW, May 4, 2011
    Last edited: May 4, 2011
    (OP)
    but D drive was formatted before upgrading to Windows 7 from Vista ....so how come it's still an issue ? :/

    C : 70.9 GB ... D : 78.1 GB


    I have both Acronis 2011 & Ghost v15 setup ...but used Windows 7 in-built backup application,
    as it seemed the most reliable since it's made by Microsoft itself :p ...I'm actually scared of Norton products :p ...and Acronis ratings were decent on Cnet...
     
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  6. BMW

    BMW MDL Novice

    Mar 23, 2011
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    I still didn't understand, why my Windows 7 on C ..points to D ...

    if that's the case, then it should've backed up only the D, to which it points .... not the C , which it thinks is D ...


    I wish there was some sort of shortcut, like an app that only changes the BootLog file, which the system is referring to...
    where it thinks C is D ...and D is C...


    if the moving thing is the only solution, I guess I'll wait it out ....and then simply move it on a C only SSD that I plan to buy some day, hopefully...

    which will have only 1 ...C partition ...
     
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  7. BMW

    BMW MDL Novice

    Mar 23, 2011
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    I guess then I'll wait it out ...and move the system image of C , on a new SSD when I buy it eventually...

    Thanks for all the help, mates :)
     
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  8. ZaForD

    ZaForD MDL Expert

    Jan 26, 2008
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    @BMW,

    When/If you get your SSD, don't 'Move' your Windows 7 install over to it.
    HDD's and SSD's work differently at a low level and use different technics to store your data.
    You'd be better off doing a clean install once you get your new SSD.

    You should do this anyway when your changing major components.
    Backup youe files, do a clean install, then restore your files, :)

    @acrsn,

    Can Windows recovery see/use Acronis backup images ?
     
  9. BMW

    BMW MDL Novice

    Mar 23, 2011
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    #10 BMW, May 6, 2011
    Last edited: May 6, 2011
    (OP)
    Thanks a lot, Acrsn & ZaForD :D

    I'm delighted to know members like yall still exist in the world ;)


    Really hoping SSD Prices crash soon :rolleyes:
     
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  10. bethel95

    bethel95 MDL Novice

    May 29, 2011
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    Another way to create C: disk image

    It's probable that the reason you're getting both C: and D: in the disk image is that Windows is creating a "system image" (i.e., an image of everything that impacts on Windows itself) and that it's seeing D: as somehow connected to its functioning. I've had this same problem myself.

    My solution (instead of creating a system image in conjunction with my file-by-file backup) has been to set up a Task Scheduler job to create the C: disk image on a schedule (which also allows me to use a different schedule than my D: file backup).

    Use TS to run the following program: wbadmin

    Use these arguments: start backup -backupTarget:X: -include:C: -quiet

    Where "X:" is replaced by your backup drive's letter.

    Start in: C:\Windows\system32

    This will create a disk image of just C: on your backup drive (using Windows' standard folder structure for image backups, of course).