Partition Table

Discussion in 'Linux' started by Kofuji, Aug 8, 2015.

  1. Kofuji

    Kofuji Guest

    #1 Kofuji, Aug 8, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 13, 2015
    DeleteDelete
     
  2. thorin0815

    thorin0815 MDL Senior Member

    Jul 16, 2015
    428
    260
    10
    #2 thorin0815, Aug 8, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2015
    You can try AOMEI Partition Assistant Free version, you can make a WinPE/Linux bootdisk/stick with it. Newly created partitions should allways be aligned (when option is checked) with it.

    But you can align old partitions lossless with it afterwards too.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  3. pf100

    pf100 MDL Addicted

    Oct 22, 2010
    843
    806
    30
  4. thorazine74

    thorazine74 MDL Novice

    Sep 22, 2008
    22
    0
    0
    #4 thorazine74, Aug 8, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2015
    If you are just going to install using the whole drive for Windows you don't really have to make a partition table beforehand, the installer will do it for you, assuming the drive is really empty with no previous partition table, following standard Windows layout, either in GPT or MBR style depending on how you boot the installer.
    It only make sense to do the partitioning if you don't want to follow standard Windows layout or you want to reserve part of the drive for a data partition or for another OS.
     
  5. anarki2

    anarki2 MDL Novice

    Nov 21, 2014
    18
    3
    0
    There's not a single reason to use MBR anymore. Both Windows and Linux supports it well. To begin with, you're limited to 4 partitions with MBR, so you'll have to resort to using logical partitions and all that crap if you need more. It's such a mess. Also, partitions are limited to 2TB and so on. Just use GPT. Also, I see no reason to use gparted, just let the installer do its thing.
     
  6. 10aout

    10aout MDL Novice

    Aug 8, 2015
    17
    2
    0
    There is one very good reason: if you are booting using "legacy" BIOS, this is the only choice (unless you are willingful to play with G4D, duet, hybrid MBR or similar advanced stuff.)

    Otherwise, if you have a newer UEFI firwmare where you have the choice, nowadays there are few reasons to not use GPT, and even less if only using Windows.