Pondering can delude. Let's calculate a dilution.

Discussion in 'Forum Games' started by Yen, Jul 18, 2014.

  1. Yen

    Yen Admin
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    May 6, 2007
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    This is an ideal experiment, means no change of volume is assumed. (In 'reality' it changes when two different liquids are mixed, for instance 50 mL of Alcohol plus 50 mL of water aren't 100 mL mixture!!!).

    But at this experiment one can safely ignore the effect.



    You have a glass of red wine and a glass of white wine. Both have exactly the same amount (volume) of wine.

    Now you take out one level spoonful of the red wine and pour it into the white wine, then you stir thoroughly.
    As next step you take out one level spoonful of the mixture and pour it back to the red wine and also stir thoroughly.

    Now think about is there more white wine in the red wine or more red wine in the white wine? And what changes if one would start with the white wine?

    After you have made your decisions, try to calculate the results (percent). It'll surprise you…or not, lol….
     
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  2. R29k

    R29k MDL GLaDOS

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    #2 R29k, Jul 18, 2014
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2014
    :eek:Well if you put one (1) spoon of white wine in the red cup and mix it thoroughly and you assume you have a uniform mixture! Then the one (1) spoon of mixture going into the white wine cup should be even. 1/2 white and 1/2 red, so I would say the white wine cup has 1/2 a spoon of red wine and the red wine cup has 1/2 a spoon of white wine. Umm this all assumes that your transfer of the liquids is the same volume.
     
  3. Yen

    Yen Admin
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    I have almost forgotten that I have posted here, lol.

    -Yes, the physics of a 'real' solution is that the concentration is everywhere the same inside of the mixture. If it wouldn't, then nobody could calculate the dilution. Any 'real' solution is homogenous, one of the major lab work is to dilute by pipetting a special volume into a new volumetric flask and adding solvent.

    We are speaking of a homogenous mixture. The phenomenon that results to that is called diffusion. When stirring thoroughly you can shorten the process.

    There are homogenous mixtures such as solutions or a mixture of two different gasses like Nitrogen and Oxygen, which are the major parts of the 'air'.
    And there are heterogeneous mixtures which have different concentrations depending on location, for instance a suspension, an emulsion, or smoke and fog.

    Yes, to make an approach we need to presume that the volume of wine transferred with the spoon is always the same. Also consider that the amount of wine increases first (volume in glass + volume in spoon transferred). Means you take out from a bigger volume when you go for the second dilution. Finally at the end the volumes of wine of both glasses are the same again.

    To make an approach one can use variables, or can assume special volumes.
     
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